GAPS Ginger Cookies

These cookies are not your usual ginger snaps because they are light and airy to bite into.  They are great on their own for a snack but make for the perfect combo with a cup of GAPS Ginger Tea.  If you had your heart set on a crispy cookie that looks just like the one […]

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GAPS Ginger Cookies
This recipe is appropriate for people who have reached stage 6 of the Introduction Diet and the Full GAPS Diet
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Prep Time 15 Minutes
Cook Time 15 Minutes
Passive Time 7 Hours
Servings
Cookies
Ingredients
Prep Time 15 Minutes
Cook Time 15 Minutes
Passive Time 7 Hours
Servings
Cookies
Ingredients
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Instructions
Preparation
  1. Preheat oven to 150˚C and prepare one large or two medium stainless steel trays by lining them with (bleach free) baking paper.
Mixing and Baking the Cookies
  1. Add all the ingredients into a bowl (except for the desiccated coconut and bicarbonate of soda).
  2. Mix the mixture with electric beaters or other mixer/thermomix. I used electric hand held beaters for this recipe.
  3. When well combined, add the desiccated coconut and add the bicarbonate of soda last.
  4. Spoon a tablespoon of mixture neatly onto the prepared lined baking trays and pat gently with the flat of one finger so that the mixture resembles a rounded semi-flat shape.
  5. Place the baking tray into the preheated oven and bake for 15 minutes. Do not be tempted to cook longer than this as the cookies will burn. If your oven tends to cook quickly, you may want to remove them sooner. The edges and tops should be browned but not burnt.
  6. Once removed from the oven, carefully slide the liner off the tray and onto a cooling tray with the cookies still in place. Let them cool this way for ten minutes to allow the cookies to cool. DO NOT try to pick them up as they will be soft and fall apart.
  7. When they are cool to touch and are becoming more solid, remove the paper lining under the cookies so that the bottoms don’t sweat. Allow the cookies to cool for a further 20 – 30 minutes on the cooling tray.
  8. The cookies will be light, airy and soft to eat. If you like them like this, you may store them in an air tight container. They will be soft to eat similar to a cake like consistency. They can be kept fresh for a week
Recipe Notes

The Excalibur food dehydrator is the best on the market.  I have had mine for ten years and it is still going strong. We have a few Excalibur Dehydrator options available at GAPS Diet Australia based on affordability and specification.  If you do purchase one, I highly recommend the one with a timer.  This helps greatly when dehydrating food on an ongoing basis.

View and listen to the cookie crunch video here

Raw Vanilla Hearts

This recipe is a great white chocolate alternative and is quick and easy to make requiring no baking what-so ever. Print Recipe Raw Vanilla Hearts This is a recipe for the Introduction Diet from Stage 6 onward. Votes: 0 Rating: 0 Rate this recipe! Course Baking at home, Deserts, Egg free recipes Cuisine Full GAPS […]

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Raw Vanilla Hearts
This is a recipe for the Introduction Diet from Stage 6 onward.
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Prep Time 10
Passive Time 30
Servings
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Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients into a food processor or thermomix and mix or pulse until all lumps are completely removed and the mixture becomes smooth for moulding
  2. Using heart silicon moulds or any other shape, press the mixture with your finger tips into the moulds until leveled.
  3. Place in the fridge to set. This can take up to half an hour or longer. Simply pop them out and store in the fridge when complete.

Basic GAPS Cookie Dough

I have been making these cookies for over ten years when my son was 3 and first diagnosed with Autism.  We made little faces on them with all kinds of different emotions.  This was to help with understanding the different emotions and prompt communication when eating them.  My son is now 14 and still enjoys […]

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Basic GAPS Cookie Dough
Suitable from Stage 6 onwards You can make little faces on these cookies with a variety of different expressions and call them emotion cookies or you can make small gingerbread men for Christmas.
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Prep Time 10 Minutes
Cook Time 10 Minutes
Servings
Cookies
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Jam
Prep Time 10 Minutes
Cook Time 10 Minutes
Servings
Cookies
Ingredients
Jam
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Instructions
Strawberry Jam
  1. Add all ingredients to a saucepan on a low simmering heat and use a wooden spoon to stir the ingredients whilst applying pressure to the strawberries to squash them into a jam sauce.
  2. Continue to do this for approximately 15 - 20 minutes on a low heat so that the mixture will thicken.
  3. Pour the jam mixture into a jar and refrigerate. This will set when cooled.

GAPS Fish Cakes

Appropriate from Stage 4 on wards

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GAPS Fish Cakes
Appropriate from Stage 4 on wards
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Prep Time 15 Minutes
Cook Time 30 Minutes
Servings
People
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Prep Time 15 Minutes
Cook Time 30 Minutes
Servings
People
Ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 170 degrees Celsius
  2. Boil fish in fish stock and strain
  3. Break up the fish with your fingers and add to a bowl
  4. Sauté onion, capsicum and celery in a pan with some fat until it is soft and translucent
  5. Grate zucchini and carrots and dice shallots
  6. Crack eggs into a food processor and whisk
  7. Add all other ingredients to the mixer and combine well (a thick consistency)
  8. Pour ingredients into paper patties in a muffin tray and cook in the oven for 30 minutes on 170 degrees Celsius
  9. Serve with salad or on its own in the kids lunch box

Fermented Sauerkraut Juice

What if you run out of sauerkraut juice on the introduction diet? Sauerkraut juice is a by-product from making sauerkraut.  There is often not enough to cater for the introduction diet stages so here is a recipe that will help you keep up with your sauerkraut juicing supplies. Print Recipe Sauerkraut Juice Votes: 0 Rating: […]

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Sauerkraut Juice
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litres
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Juice Ingredients
Servings
litres
Ingredients
Juice Ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Fresh press your cabbage to make close to a litre of cabbage juice.
  2. And add either a cup of whey dripped from your yoghurt or kefir or use some yoghurt starter or vegetable culture.
  3. A cup of water can be added to top it up.
  4. Ferment the juice on the bench for 24 – 48 hours at room temperature and you will notice it will become slightly carbonated or effervescent. It is good to use a glass container that is sealed tight. Be sure to release any gas build up in the bottle by loosening the jar and tightening it again during the fermentation process.
Recipe Notes

Store in the fridge when fermentation is complete.

If you are keen like I am to use a natural hair treatment that actually works as a protector for your hair that nourishes rather than use a product that coats and resembles an end result at the cost of submerging yourself in chemicals, then this is something you can make and practice at home […]

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  • 1 Organic egg use egg yolk for dry hair, whole egg for normal hair and egg white for oily greasy hair types
  • 4 Tbs Yoghurt Plain yoghurt
  • 2 Tbs olive oil Alternatively you may use coconut oil or almond oil
  • 1 Tbs Lemon juice Alternatively use Apple Cider Vinegar
Servings
Ingredients
  • 1 Organic egg use egg yolk for dry hair, whole egg for normal hair and egg white for oily greasy hair types
  • 4 Tbs Yoghurt Plain yoghurt
  • 2 Tbs olive oil Alternatively you may use coconut oil or almond oil
  • 1 Tbs Lemon juice Alternatively use Apple Cider Vinegar
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Instructions
  1. In a bowl, mix together all ingredients with a whisk by first mixing the egg, followed by plain yoghurt, olive oil and lemon juice. Mixing as each ingredient is added. Please note: use egg yolk for dry hair, whole egg for normal hair and egg white for oily greasy hair types.
  2. Using a basting brush, apply the mask to the roots of your hair through to the tips and massage the mask throroughly into the scalp for 5 minutes.
  3. Twist your hair up in a clip (if long) and cover with a couple of wraps of paper towel to avoid any drips and leave the mask on your hair for 20 minutes.
  4. After 20 minutes, wrinse your hair with water to remove majority of the mask residue. Using a healthy (chemical free) shampoo, wash your hair as you do normally to remove the residue completely. Follow this with a apple cider vinegar rinse to leave your hair shiny and soft. Simply apply to the scalp and massage through to the tips. I find I need a little conditioner on the tips to help with detangling my hair befor the final rinse and dry off.
  5. Apply the hair mask twice a month or once a week depending on your hair type, condition or desired result. Here is a photo of my hair after a quick blow dry to give an idea of the natural shine. It is not a professional shot, just a bathroom selfie. I have not coloured my hair for over 7 years so it is nice to avoid the hair salon chemicals and keep it simple at home.
Recipe Notes

In between treatments I do like to do an apple cider vinegar scalp massage and rinse for general upkeep.

Our hair and the natural oil that comes from our scalp, known as sebum, have a pH level of between 4.5 and 5.5. When kept at this acidity level, the scalp is safeguarded against fungal and bacterial growth, ensuring healthy hair and skin.  Unfortunately, many shampoos and other hair products disrupt this natural pH which can affect the cuticles of the hair and the condition of the scalp.
Apple cider vinegar is naturally high in acetic acid and has a pH level which is close to that of human hair.  Regularly rinsing with this vinegar can help bring your scalp and hair to its ideal acidity, especially if you have oily hair.

 

Apple cider vinegar stimulates better blood circulation to the hair follicles – something that is vital for encouraging hair growth and preventing hair loss. Furthermore, this blood carries essential nutrients to the hair follicle cells, strengthening the roots and promoting growth.

When applying ACV, make sure you allow it to sit in the hair and on the scalp for at least three minutes which, is the time the vinegar requires to break up the molecular structure of any built up residue, allowing it to be easily rinsed away.  I generally like to massage it for this time.

You may be concerned that you’ll smell like a pickle after this rinse, don’t be! Once your hair dries, the vinegar smell will disappear.  I can honestly say, my hair does not smell at all like vinegar after a rinse, just healthy and clean.

Meat Jelly Slice

This recipe is appropriate for stage two onwards This dish is a traditionally known remedy for digestive problems and is famous for its healing powers and nourishing components such as gelatine, glucosamine, glycoproteins, phospholipids etc… A highly recommended recipe of Dr Natasha’s for healing tummies. Print Recipe Meat Jelly Slice Votes: 0 Rating: 0 Rate […]

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Meat Jelly Slice
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Instructions
  1. Bring 2 litres of water to boil and place pigs trotters into the pot. Boil the trotters for a further 5 minutes and then remove the trotters from the pot whilst discarding the water. (this is to clean and prepare the trotters).
  2. Bring a new pot to boil with 3 litres of water with all 4 pigs trotters added (ensuring that they are completely covered).
  3. Add pepper, salt, onion and bay leaves and cook on a low heat with the lid on for 5 hours.
  4. By the 3rd Hour; add the remaining meat cuts and bring to the boil and lower the heat again. Make sure to keep the meat covered by the broth and top up if water if needed.
  5. Continue to cook with the lid slightly to the side to allow for some evaporation of the stock so that you can establish the right amount of broth for the perfect batch. Too much water will not allow the broth to solidify whilst too little can make it too hard.
  6. By the 4th Hour; add remaining vegetables except for the sliced garlic cloves. Cook for a further 50 minutes and add the garlic in the last 5 minutes. The broth should appear thick and the meat tender and soft. Turn off the heat and remove from the stove
  7. Strain all the meat and vegetables from the stock and remove any bones and unwanted parts from the pigs trotters. Set aside remaining meat and parts of meat from the trotters and throw away the vegetables. Remove and throw away the leak, celery and onion remains.
  8. Strain the broth again through a cheese cloth and set aside. Slice the carrots and meat collected from the pigs trotters and other meats. Place carrot slices, garlic and meat pieces in a deep dish and pour the broth over the top to ensure that all the meat is covered.
  9. Place meat jelly into the fridge to set overnight.
Recipe Notes

Serving

This can be cut into slices and served cold with salad or vegetables with a cup of meat stock.  It is important to always remember to eat protein with vegetables.

Points

You may alternatively use small bowls or cups to set and serve your meat jelly.

You may use other meats such as fish (salmon) or chicken to create this meal.

Optional additional ingredients after intro

½ tea spoon of appropriate all spice - this can be added to the pot at step three only when the patient is on the full GAPS Diet or has shown signs of digestion improvement.

Sprig of rosemary (if using lamb)

Osso Buco

This recipe is stage two appropriate & onwards This recipe can be cooked in a slow cooker or in the oven.  I prefer to cook this in a slow cooker but it depends if you wish to brown the meat at the end a little in the oven by removing the lid and turning it […]

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Osso Buco
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Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 6-8 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
  • 6-8 cuts Beef Osso buco cuts These are cuts of meat with the marrow bone in the centre
  • 2 whole Onions Diced
  • 6 cloves garlic Crushed
  • 1-2 whole Carrots Diced
  • 1-2 whole Zucchini Diced
  • 2-3 whole Tomatoes Diced
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp Thyme Optional
  • 1/4 tsp Oregano Optional
  • 1 inch piece Ginger root Finely grated (weigh the peeled ginger on a food scale before grating or mincing to determine the correct measurement for the recipe)
  • 1 inch peice Tumeric root Finely grated (weigh the peeled tumeric on a food scale before grating or mincing to determine the correct measurement for the recipe)
  • 2 tbs Tomato paste Organic and sugar free (no additives)
  • 3 Bayleaves
  • 1 cup Meat Stock
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 6-8 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
  • 6-8 cuts Beef Osso buco cuts These are cuts of meat with the marrow bone in the centre
  • 2 whole Onions Diced
  • 6 cloves garlic Crushed
  • 1-2 whole Carrots Diced
  • 1-2 whole Zucchini Diced
  • 2-3 whole Tomatoes Diced
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp Thyme Optional
  • 1/4 tsp Oregano Optional
  • 1 inch piece Ginger root Finely grated (weigh the peeled ginger on a food scale before grating or mincing to determine the correct measurement for the recipe)
  • 1 inch peice Tumeric root Finely grated (weigh the peeled tumeric on a food scale before grating or mincing to determine the correct measurement for the recipe)
  • 2 tbs Tomato paste Organic and sugar free (no additives)
  • 3 Bayleaves
  • 1 cup Meat Stock
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Instructions
  1. Chop onions and crush garlic and combine them with tomatoes, tumeric, ginger, thyme, oregano, olive oil and tomato paste in food processor. Blend mixture until all ingredients are well diced and results in a thick paste.
  2. Place osso buco, in crock pot and add all other prepared chopped vegetables and ingredients including the bay leaves and cup of meat stock.
  3. Cook slow on low for several hours until the meat begins to fall off the bones. This can be achieved in the oven for 4 hours (covered with lid) on a low heat 160 Degrees Celsius or during the day in a slow cooker for 6 – 8 hours on low.
  4. If you are cooking this recipe in the oven and wish to brown the meat a little and create a more caramelised flavour, you may remove the lid and turn the oven up to 200 Degrees Celsius at the end of the cooking time for the last half an hour.
Recipe Notes

Serve

Serve this healing nutrient dense meal with a warm cup of stock to drink on the side.

Traditional Wild Sauerkraut & Sauerkraut Juice

Wild fermentation is specific to the live organisms naturally present on the raw vegetables. This is the traditional way to ferment vegetables and sauerkraut because there are abundant lactic acid bacteria on all plants and if submerged under its own juices with a good coverage of salt (regardless of what type vessel they are contained […]

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Traditional Wild Sauerkraut & Sauerkraut Juice
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Prep Time 45 mins
Passive Time 4 weeks
Servings
litre
Ingredients
Cabbage mixture
  • 1 kg Cabbage The green cabbages produce more brine – select a good quality fresh organic cabbage that is not dry or too old
  • 2 - 3 tbl Celtic or Himalayan Sea Salt Salt is a traditional ingredient in sauerkraut because it increases shelf life, texture, and flavor. The amount of salt used can vary according to personal taste but too little can spoit the batch. The salt helps to preserve.
Special equipment
  • 1 Fermenting Jar/Vessle There are many kinds of fermenting vessles on the market. You can make your own at home or spend extra money on something fancy. See our notes for recommendations
  • 1 Heavy weight this is used to keep the cabbage submerged under its own juices
  • 1 Cabbage/vegetable pounder This aids to help push and compress the cabbage or fermented vegetables so that they are submerged udner their own brine
  • 1 Unbleached cheesecloth
Prep Time 45 mins
Passive Time 4 weeks
Servings
litre
Ingredients
Cabbage mixture
  • 1 kg Cabbage The green cabbages produce more brine – select a good quality fresh organic cabbage that is not dry or too old
  • 2 - 3 tbl Celtic or Himalayan Sea Salt Salt is a traditional ingredient in sauerkraut because it increases shelf life, texture, and flavor. The amount of salt used can vary according to personal taste but too little can spoit the batch. The salt helps to preserve.
Special equipment
  • 1 Fermenting Jar/Vessle There are many kinds of fermenting vessles on the market. You can make your own at home or spend extra money on something fancy. See our notes for recommendations
  • 1 Heavy weight this is used to keep the cabbage submerged under its own juices
  • 1 Cabbage/vegetable pounder This aids to help push and compress the cabbage or fermented vegetables so that they are submerged udner their own brine
  • 1 Unbleached cheesecloth
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Instructions
Sauerkraut Mixture
  1. Thinly slice or shred the cabbage and place it into a large bowl. A good quality mandolin is great for shredding. A big cooking pot is good to contain the cabbage for this will allow you to easily get your hands into the mix later.
  2. Add a generous amount of salt to the mixture and mix the salt into the cabbage with your hands. Let it sit for 10 – 20 minutes to allow the salt to draw out some of the cabbage juice naturally. Salt actually allows the cabbage to sweat so that juices can be extracted to create the brine. 2 tablesppons of salt per 1kg cabbage.
  3. After you have allowed the cabbage to sit for 20 minutes, mix, massage and knead the ingredients with your hands. Bruising the cabbage this way allows the cabbage to extract more natural brine solution. Keep kneading until you have squeezed a substantial amount of juice from the mixture. This may take approximately 10-20 minutes. It is always handy to have someone with strong hands to do the kneading & massaging.
  4. Place the cabbage mixture into the selected kraut vessel and pack and push the mixture down so that the cabbage is compacted in the bottom and the juice is sitting on the top of the cabbage with a minimum of 4 - 5cm’s or 2 inches of the juice above. It is important to push the cabbage down firmly so that no air is trapped and the cabbage is completely submerged in and under its own brine juice. A cabbage/vegetable pounder or potato masher can be a good tool for this.
  5. Most fermented vegetable kits will have a weight but if you do not have a kit with a weight, simply make your own weight by using a plate that fits snug in the fermenting vessle and place it on the top of the cabbage and then place a smaller jar (filled with water) on top of the plate to weigh the cabbage down and keep it submerged. Push the jar down and you will see more juice rise to the top. It is very important to ensure that all the sauerkraut is submerged under its own juice. Don’t worry if you don’t have a weight to push it down, just try to make sure that all the cabbage remains under the brine and if any bits float up, remove them throughout the process to prevent them from going mouldy.
  6. When all the cabage is submerged under its own juices with the weight keeping it down, cover the top with a double folded cheesecloth to keep away the dust and store in a dark place for four weeks (ie pantry). If you use a canning jar with a rubber ring top, and close the lid, be sure to burp it a few times in the first few days to release the pressure or it will burst - you won’t need the cheesecloth if you use this type of jar. Keep checking to remove any mould or scum build up floating on the top and make sure the kraut remains under its own juices. The sauerkraut may be consumed and ready to eat after 2 weeks but it matures better and contains more good bacteria wioth more time. The sauerkraut may be stored in the fridge after 2 - 4 weeks of fermentation. If there is any scum or mould development on the top – remove this. The kraut remaining under the juice will be fine.
  7. After the cabbage has completed the fermentation process it becomes preserved and will last up to 12 months in the fridge. Fermentation is the traditional way we preserved food before companies decided to create synthetic harmful preservative options.
Kraut Juice
  1. The juice remaining in the kraut jar is a by-product of the sauerkraut but it is just as probiotic and benneficial to consume as the kraut itself. Do not discard the juice, either leave it in the jar and consume it gradually along with the kraut or strain it into a bottle to use as a fermented probiotic drink. This juice is what we like to use in the introduction stages of the GAPS Diet. It is introduced slowely and methodically. Refer to the GAPS introduction stagesfor this method.
Recipe Notes

Alternative options

This is a wild feremtnation method which often takes a little more time to ferment naturally, however you can assist this process further by inoculating the kraut batch with good bacteria from the very beginning by adding a vegetable starter culture to the mixture and massage that through with your hands along with the salt.

You may add other vegetables like grated carrots and other favourites such as caraway seeds or dill. 

Trouble shooting

If for any reason the cabbage is not submerged under enough of its own juices, you may need to add a small amount of filtered water with more salt (15 gms of salt to 1 ltr).

Sauerkraut & how to introduce it

 

 

 

Almond Milk

Preparation in making nut milk is important, especially for people who already have digestive problems and food sensitivities. Almonds (as well as most other nuts) contain toxic substances known as enzyme inhibitors and phytates (phytic acid).  These toxins can play havoc in the digestive system, blocking nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, copper iron and especially […]

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Almond Milk
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Prep Time 15 mins
Passive Time 15 hrs
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Prep Time 15 mins
Passive Time 15 hrs
Servings
cups
Ingredients
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Instructions
Soaking and wrinsing
  1. Add 4 cups of water to a jug or bowl and mix in 1 tablespoon of salt
  2. Add 1 cup of almonds and cover with a tea towel or cheese cloth.
  3. Soak the nuts in the salt water brine for 12 hours in total, ensuring that you rinse the nuts twice during this time.
  4. When rinsing the nuts under filtered water the second time, aim to remove the salt residue and discard the salt water brine.
  5. Place the nuts in a clean jug or bowl and add 1 - 2 teaspoons of flaxseeds (optional) remainig 4 cups of water and place in the fridge for 2 – 3 hours. Adding the flaxseeds will allow the milk to thicken a little more. Exclude this step if you have no concern for thickness.
  6. If you wish to add a little sweetener to the milk, this will be the stage that you will need to add the pitted dates to the mixture to soak for a few hours. This is optional.
Blending and strainnig
  1. Add the soaked nut mixture from the fridge (including the water) to a good strong blender, vitamix or thermo mixer and blend for as long as it takes to break down the size of the nuts into a pulp consistency.
  2. Place a nut milk bag or cheesecloth over a bowl and pour the milk mixture through the cheesecloth or nut milk bag like a strainer.
  3. When all the pulp and liquid has been strained through the nut milk bag or cheesecloth, squeeze any excess milk from the pulp mixture with your hands, allowing the milk to drain through the cloth. If you find that the milk is too rich, simply add more filtered water.
  4. Store in the fridge for 2 – 3 days.

Ghee (clarified butter)

  It’s hard to improve on butter, but… Ghee, a traditional Indian preparation, eliminates the milk solids and gives you just the pure, unadulterated butterfat. It’s gheelicious. And it doesn’t burn, so it is a perfect choice for high temperature frying. Before introducing butter on the GAPS diet, the introduction stages advises to introduce ghee […]

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Ghee (clarified butter)
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Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
tub
Ingredients
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
tub
Ingredients
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Instructions
Option one
  1. Preheat your oven to approximately 60 – 120 Degrees Celsius.
  2. Add a large block of unsalted organic butter to a glass or stainless steel oven dish and leave it in the oven for 45 – 60 minutes.
  3. The liquid in the dish will separate with milk solids on the bottom (liquid creamy white colour), ghee in the middle (yellow) with some floaty bits of whey on top (crusty yellow and golden brown floaty bits). The whey can be carefully scooped out from the top with a tea strainer and the yellow liquid which is the ghee can be carefully poured into a jar with a cheese cloth on top to catch any whey or unwanted milk solids. Try not to disrupt the milk solids and ensure that they remain in the bottom of the pan as you pour out the ghee.
  4. Discard the milk solids and refrigerate the ghee in glass jars.
Option two
  1. Melt the unsalted butter in a saucepan over low heat. Don't stir.
  2. Reduce heat and let the melted butter simmer for an hour or until a firm "foam" forms on the surface.
  3. Remove the foam with a flat head stainless steel seive straining spoon (see image). On the bottom, you'll now see white milk protein, which you want to leave behind in the pan or filter out of your ghee.
  4. Carefully pour the clarified butter through a cheese cloth. The white milk protein should remain in the cloth, while the clear butterfat seeps through.
  5. Repeat the filtering a couple of times for optimal results.
  6. Let the ghee cool in a glass jar and store at room temperature.
Recipe Notes

Other Options: You can use your slow cooker to make ghee. Put the butter in it and turn on low heat for 6-8 hours. Then follow the steps above.

Fermented Almond Flour

If the introduction of nuts or nut flour persists to be a problem for people starting the GAPS Diet, you may wish to ferment the nut flour itself. Both nuts and seeds contain phytates, phenols and oxalates etc and these can make it difficult for some people (not all) to digest whilst their gut is […]

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Fermented Almond Flour
Fermenting Almond Flour
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Prep Time 5 mins
Passive Time 24 hours
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Fermenting mixture
  • 2-3 cups Blanched almond flour Organic - quantity here is dependant upon how much you plan to use for the recipe intended
  • 1 cup Whey This is the dripped liquid from your yoghurt - see whey recipe
  • 2 cups Filtered water
Special equipment
Prep Time 5 mins
Passive Time 24 hours
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Fermenting mixture
  • 2-3 cups Blanched almond flour Organic - quantity here is dependant upon how much you plan to use for the recipe intended
  • 1 cup Whey This is the dripped liquid from your yoghurt - see whey recipe
  • 2 cups Filtered water
Special equipment
Fermenting Almond Flour
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Instructions
  1. Add the almond flour into a bowl or dish
  2. Mix filtered water with a cup of whey and pour over the almond flour
  3. Leave the bowl or dish on the kitchen bench top at room temperature for 24 hours.
  4. When 24 hours have passed, drain the flour through a cheescloth and use the drained flour directly in baking.

Fermented Fish

This is a very easy and nutritious probiotic meal to prepare. *This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage Two – onwards Print Recipe Fermented Fish Votes: 0 Rating: 0 Rate this recipe! Course Main Dishes, Vegetables & Ferments Cuisine Full GAPS Diet Recipes, GAPS Introduction Stages Prep Time 25 Mins Passive Time […]

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Fermented Fish
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Prep Time 25 Mins
Passive Time 3 Days
Servings
Litre jar
Ingredients
Prep Time 25 Mins
Passive Time 3 Days
Servings
Litre jar
Ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Skin the fish and remove the bones, cut into mouth size pieces.
  2. Put the pieces of the fish into the jar mixing with slightly crushed peppercorns, a few slices of white onion (optional), coriander seeds, bay leaves and dill seeds or dill herb.
  3. In a separate jug add ½ litre of water and dissolve 1 tablespoon of sea salt and 3-4 tablespoons of your homemade whey. Pour this brine into the jar with the fish until the fish is completely covered; if the fish is not covered just add more water.
  4. Close the jar tightly and leave to ferment for 3-5 days at a room temperature, then store in the fridge.
  5. This fish does not keep long, so consume in the next few days. Serve with avocado, lemons and onions.
Recipe Notes

Alternative Options

Another way to ferment fish: buy some fresh sardines (also works for herring and mackerel), de-scale the fish, cut the heads off and clean the belly out. Put into a suitable size glass jar or a stainless steel pan. Add 1-2 cups of whey, 1-2 tablespoons of salt (per 1 litre), a teaspoon of black pepper corns (freshly crushed), 10 bay leaves and ½ a teaspoon of coriander seeds (freshly crushed). Top up with water so the fish is completely covered with water, you may want to float a small plate on top of the fish to keep it submerged in the brine. Cover the pan or put the lid on the jar and let it ferment for 3-5 days at a room temperature. When the fish is ready take the meat off the bones, cut into bite-size pieces and serve with avocado, fresh dill and some chopped red onion.

GAPS Meat and Vegetable Soup

Both GAPS soups and stocks are the powerhouse to rebuilding your health. They are the most nourishing healing source on the GAPS Nutrition Protocol and every GAPS home should have a fridge and freezer stocked with them. We understand that keeping up with food supply can be time taxing on a GAPS family so your […]

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GAPS Meat and Vegetable Soup
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Prep Time 50 Minutes
Cook Time 3 Hours
Servings
Litre batch
Ingredients
Vegetables
Meat & Stock
  • 1 Litre Meat Stock Select from the meat stock preference you made earlier
  • 1 Meat joint This was used to make the meat stock recipe and put aside - or you can select a fresh gelatinous meat joint from the bone and use that. Also include bone marrow and gelatinous soft tissue
Prep Time 50 Minutes
Cook Time 3 Hours
Servings
Litre batch
Ingredients
Vegetables
Meat & Stock
  • 1 Litre Meat Stock Select from the meat stock preference you made earlier
  • 1 Meat joint This was used to make the meat stock recipe and put aside - or you can select a fresh gelatinous meat joint from the bone and use that. Also include bone marrow and gelatinous soft tissue
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Rating: 0
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Instructions
  1. Bring some of the meat stock to boil, add chopped or sliced vegetables: onions, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, courgettes, marrow, squash, pumpkin, etc. and simmer for 25-35 minutes. When on the introduction diet, you can choose any combination of available vegetables avoiding very fibrous ones, such as all varieties of cabbage and celery. All particularly fibrous parts of vegetables need to be removed, such as skin and seeds on pumpkins, zucchini and squash, remove stalk from broccoli and cauliflower and any other parts that look too fibrous.
  2. Add the meat that you set aside from making the stock and cook the vegetables well, so that they are really soft and easy to digest. If you have already used the stock in other recipes, we recommend you cook some meat according to the recommendations shown in the stock recipe first and then add the vegetables.
  3. When vegetables are well cooked, add the crushed garlic, bring to boil and turn the heat off. We want the garlic to be added at the end to be only slightly cooked to receive maximum immune benefits from it.
  4. If you are cooking for children who are fussy eaters or for babies starting out on solids, you can blend the soup which will make it easier. This recipe will generally keep in the fridge for 5 days but can also be frozen.
Recipe Notes

Serving for GAPS

Serve the soup with a drizzle of cold pressed extra virgin olive oil on top (1-2 tbl sp).  Add sauerkraut or juice or eat  1 – 2 table spoons sauerkraut at the beginning of the meal.

Never add sauerkraut, its juice or olive oil directly to any hot food as this will kill the enzymes and minor component nutrients.  Always wait for the food to cool before adding them.  The general rule is:  if you can put your finger in it, then it’s ready.  Refer to the introduction diet for the progressive introduction of sauerkraut and olive oil.

The ratio of stock, meat and vegetables is individual and dependant upon the size of the batch you wish to make.

Clinical Notes:

The introduction diet is primarily designed for people suffering with diarrhoea and that is why the chosen vegetables are low in fibre.  If you have chosen to follow the introduction diet because of leaky gut and food allergies but are more susceptible to constipation, it is important to add more fibrous vegetables like cabbage and celery.  Don’t avoid cutting of stems from broccoli etc and leave the skins and seeds on vegetables like zucchini.  You may even decide to serve up some well cooked beetroot with your soup.

Hints

  • Cut vegetables and meat into small neat sized pieces unless you plan to blend or puree it.

Other suggested and allowable ingredients

  • Fresh or dried Italian or French mushrooms can be added to pork, lamb or beef soup to enhance the flavour. Dried mushrooms can be crushed by had before adding to the soup
  • Chopped parsley, coriander, oregano or dill
  • A spoonful of yoghurt or sour cream (creme fraiche)
  • Red onion
  • Spring onion
  • Cooked ground liver
  • Boiled eggs (yolk still runny)
  • Raw or cooked beetroots
  • Other herbs and spices (only when digestion has started to show improvements)

 

GAPS Staple Casserole

This recipe is a slow cooked method in the oven that produces a lovely tender meat that falls off the bone with a delicious flavour.  It can also be used for babies by blending the food in a food mixer with stock. *This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage Two – onwards […]

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GAPS Staple Casserole
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
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Prep Time 45 Minutes
Cook Time 4-6 hrs
Servings
People
Ingredients
Meat and Stock
  • 1 Lamb Shoulder See notes for other meat options
  • 1 Litre Filtered water Approcimate: this is dependant upon how bif the pot is and the size of the lamb
Herbs & Spices
Vegetables
  • 6-8 Cloves garlic Crushed - See notes caution
  • 1 Whole Onion Large - See notes caution
  • 2 Whole Celery sticks Finely diced - See notes caution
  • 2 Whole Carrots Finely diced - See notes caution
  • 1/2 Whole Pumpkin Cubed - See notes caution
  • 1/2 Head of Cauliflower Cut - See notes caution
Special Equipment
Prep Time 45 Minutes
Cook Time 4-6 hrs
Servings
People
Ingredients
Meat and Stock
  • 1 Lamb Shoulder See notes for other meat options
  • 1 Litre Filtered water Approcimate: this is dependant upon how bif the pot is and the size of the lamb
Herbs & Spices
Vegetables
  • 6-8 Cloves garlic Crushed - See notes caution
  • 1 Whole Onion Large - See notes caution
  • 2 Whole Celery sticks Finely diced - See notes caution
  • 2 Whole Carrots Finely diced - See notes caution
  • 1/2 Whole Pumpkin Cubed - See notes caution
  • 1/2 Head of Cauliflower Cut - See notes caution
Special Equipment
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
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Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 140 degrees Celsius. Place your meat joint or other selection of meat into an oval cast iron pot and fill 2/3 with filtered water. Be sure not to cover the meat joint completely with water, because the exposed part at the top of the meat produces a lovely tasting stock for drinking. This recipe should allow you to save a few jars of stock when you are done.
  2. If tollerated (see recipe notes) dice some onion and celery and crush some garlic and saute in a seperate pan with a little lamb fat or duck fat and add to the pot. It is often nicew to salt the top of the lamb and add some of the sauteed ingredints on top as well as surrounding the lamb in the stock.
  3. Add salt, dried herbs, bay leaves and a sprig of rosemary. Cover with the pot with the lid and cook on very low heat for 4-6 hours (125 – 140 degrees Celsius).
  4. After 4 or 5 hours add a variety of chopped vegetables . We have made some suggestions for you above that work nicely but feel free to experiment with seasonal organic vegetables. At this time it is essential to leave the lid off in the final stages of cooking and increase the temperature to 180 degrees celsius and cook for a further 40-50 minutes.
  5. When cooked, serve the meat and vegetables and use the stock (strained through a sieve) for a warm drink with your meal. Keep left over stock in the fridge or freezer for later meals or stock drinks.
Recipe Notes

Alternative Recipe Options

You can use any of the following meats (joint meats are easier to digest than muscle meats) Try to use a broad range of different meats each time you cook this meal.

  • Shoulder of lamb
  • Joint of pork
  • Joint of beef
  • Pheasant
  • Quail
  • Venison
  • Whole chicken
  • Turkey legs
  • Lamb shanks

You may experiment by adding a variety of vegetables keeping a broad range in your diet, however make sure you are ready for them - Refer to clinical notes.

The fat content of these meals need to be quite high: the more fresh animal fats you consume the faster the recovery.  Be sure to add fermented vegetables with every serving.  If you are still in the introduction stage, avoid spices at this stage and only use herbs, salt, and bay leaves.  This meal is easy to cook and provides you with a variety of options to choose from.  If you make a large batch, this meal is easily frozen and defrosted and heated in a glass Pyrex dish with a glass lid in the oven.  Cooking several of these meals and freezing them will allow you to have a break in the kitchen.

This method can be achieved with a slow cooker

Clinical Notes:

Avoid vegetables and consume only the meat and stock from this recipe if the patient is experiencing profuse diarrhoea.  Vegetables should be added gradually until well tollerated and digestion improves.

*This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage Two - onwards

Meat Stock

A good meat stock must be made with several kinds of bones with meat still on them.  This recipe allows you to select the category of meat stock you wish to make whether it be beef or chicken etc and from those lists, the selections allow you to choose from the bones and meat cuts […]

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Meat Stock
Meat stock provides important building blocks for the rapidly growing cells in the gut lining and has a soothing effect on any area of inflammation in the gut. That is why they aid digestion and have been known for centuries as healing folk remedies for the digestive tract. Do not use commercially available soup stock granules or bouillon cubes, they are highly processed and are full of detrimental ingredients. Chicken stock is particularly gentle on the stomach and is very good to start from. To make good meat stock you need joints, bones, gelatinous meat (which is meat on the bone like a whole chicken, lamb necks/shanks or osso buco cuts), giblets from chicken, goose or duck, whole pigeons, pheasants or other inexpensive meats. It is essential to use bones and joints, as they provide the healing substances, not so much the muscle meats. Ask your butcher to cut some large tubular marrow bones in half, so you can get the bone marrow out of them after cooking. The bone marrow can be added to soup broths or eaten just as it is. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours. The intro diet suggests using meat stock and when intro is complete, you can try the bone broth if you want to. This recipe has supplied a few options of bones and meat cuts to choose from, however you are not limited to them. Other cuts from goat and game etc can also be used and are very delicious. Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride strongly recommends local game sources for nourishment. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onwards