Raw Milk Kefir

The GAPS ‘dairy introduction structure‘ promotes introducing whey first followed by yoghurt and then Kefir.  When introducing any of these, we do it methodically by first conducting the ‘food sensitivity test‘ first, followed by adding small amounts at a time added to other food to ensure they are well tolerated. This approach is used because […]

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Raw Milk Kefir
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Food Sensitivity Test

Introducing Dairy The GAPS ‘dairy introduction structure’ promotes introducing whey first followed by yoghurt and then Kefir. When introducing any of these, we do it methodically by first conducting the ‘food sensitivity test’ first, followed by adding small amounts at a time added to other food to ensure they are well tolerated. This approach is […]

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Food Sensitivity Test
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Dairy Introduction Structure

Introducing Dairy The GAPS ‘dairy introduction structure’ promotes introducing whey first followed by yoghurt and then Kefir. When introducing any of these, we do it methodically by first conducting the ‘food sensitivity test’ first, followed by adding small amounts at a time added to other food to ensure they are well tolerated. This approach is […]

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Dairy Introduction Structure
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Turkey/Chicken Leg Casserole

This recipe is an extract from the GAPS Book as a staple for the Introduction Diet as well as the full GAPS Diet.  It is an easy delicious meal to prepare and is easily modified to cater for need or preference.  Please refer to the clinical notes for people undertaking the Introduction Diet Stages for […]

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Turkey/Chicken Leg Casserole
This recipe is appropriate for the Introduction Diet from Stage Two onward, however if sever digestive disturbances are experienced, please refer to the clinical notes below for modifications.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2.45 hours
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2.45 hours
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Instructions
  1. In a large oval casserole pot, add the stock, water, slat, tomato puree, cayenne pepper and herbs.
  2. Mix well and then add the turkey or chicken legs
  3. The tops of the turkey legs will be exposed from the other ingredients. Brush the legs with some duck fat and lightly salt the legs.
  4. Add Diced onion, celery and crushed garlic to a fry pan with a tablespoon of duck fat and saute until soft and then add to the casserole pot.
  5. Add the casserole pot to a preheated oven at 160 Degrees Celsius WITH LID OFF for 2 hours and 45 minutes.
  6. After the Casserole has been cooking for 2 hours, add the chopped vegetables. Mix them well into the sauce and leave cooking for a further 45 minutes.
  7. When the vegetables are cooked, remove the casserole from the oven. Serve the meat and vegetables on a dish and pour a few tablespoons of the sauce over the top.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Fibrous vegetables such as celery must be avoided for people with severed digestive disturbances such as diarrhoea.  Broccoli and Cauliflower stalks must be completely removed only using the heads and vegetables containing any seeds, or skins must be removed.

Introducing Raw Vegetables

Introducing Raw Vegetables in Stage 5 of the GAPS Introduction Diet Intervention instructions: Add raw vegetables starting from the following: 1. Softer parts of lettuce and cucumber 2. When the above two vegetables are well tolerated, start adding other raw vegetables such as carrot, tomato, onion, cabbage, capsicum, celery etc. Points • Refer to Clinic […]

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Introducing Raw Vegetables
This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet from stage Five onward
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Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Monitor stools: If diarrhoea returns or becomes a new concern, your patient is not ready for this food and should remain on the step prior for longer.

Fried Egg

How do you like your eggs? The GAPS Introduction Diet introduces soft boiled eggs first in stage two followed by scrambled or fried in stage 3. Relatively simple this recipe can be adjusted to suit the individual in terms of sunny side up and sunny side down, however the important thing to remember is to […]

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Fried Egg
This recipe is appropriate for the Introduction Diet from stage 3 onward.
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  1. Add the ghee to the fry pan and set on medium heat. Do not allow the ghee to burn
  2. I recommend cracking the egg into a small bowl first, and then pouring that gently into the pan. Make sure to pour slowly, letting the whites find their placement for 1 or 2 seconds before letting the yolk slip into the middle of the pan. Of course, you’re welcome to just crack and pour the egg directly into the pan.
  3. Cook the egg until the whites are cooked and the egg yolk is still runny. That is an official GAPS egg. We want the yolks to be runny to maximise the nutrition from the egg. You can flip the egg if you wish to have a sunny side down, however be careful not to over cook the yolk. Sunny side up will allow you to monitor the cooking of the yolk much better.

Scrambled Eggs

The GAPS Introduction Diet introduces scrambled eggs or fried eggs in stage three.  This is a simple and very quick recipe requiring very little preparation.  The ingredients contain only egg with a little ghee for cooking, however for more fluffier eggs, you can add a couple of tablespoons of sour cream or kefir. Print Recipe […]

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Scrambled Eggs
This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introductions Diet from stage 3 onward
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Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 3 minutes
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Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 3 minutes
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Instructions
  1. Crack the eggs into a glass bowl
  2. Use a fork to beat eggs together.
  3. Melt ghee or duck fat in a fripan over low heat. Don't allow the ghee to burn.
  4. Add egg mixture and gently pull eggs to the center of the pan and let the liquid parts run out under the perimeter.
  5. Cook, continually moving eggs with the metal spatula, just until eggs are set. This will take approximately 1 to 3 minutes.
  6. Season with salt and pepper; serve hot with a little parsley.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

When on the Full GAPS Diet, if digestion has improved you may introduce onion and celery to the mixture as well.

Guacamole

Serve ripe avocado daily with every bowl of soup and with meats and fish. Avocados are a great source of vitamins C, E, K, and B-6, as well as riboflavin, niacin, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, and potassium. They also provide lutein, beta-carotene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Although most of the calories in an avocado come […]

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Guacamole
This recipe is appropriate from stage three onward
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Instructions
  1. Slice the avocado down the middle and around the seed. Remove the seed and scoop the avocado out of it's skin and place into a small bowl.
  2. Crush the garlic with a garlic crusher and add it to the avocado. You may want to start with a small amount of garlic as raw garlic can have quite a bite, however one of the best foods for the immune system so I like to have at least 4 cloves.
  3. Add the lemon juice and crush all the ingredients together with the back of a fork or use a potato masher. When the texture is smooth to your liking, store in the fridge. The lemon juice will help preserve the colour for a while and it should last a couple of days in the fridge.

Cooking the perfect GAPS egg

Eggs are the easiest food to digest and their nourishment has been compared to breast milk because it can be absorbed almost 100 percent without needing digestion.  Egg yolks provide many amino acids, vitamins (B1, B2, B6, B12, A, D & biotin), essential fatty acids, magnesium and zinc among many others.  Eggs are particularly high […]

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Cooking the perfect GAPS Egg
Eggs are appropriate for the introduction diet from stage 2 onward and for the GAPS Baby Diet Protocol from stage 4 onward
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Prep Time 1 minutes
Cook Time 3-5 minutes
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  • 1 egg organic free range
Prep Time 1 minutes
Cook Time 3-5 minutes
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  • 1 egg organic free range
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Instructions
  1. Cook the egg so that the egg white is cooked and the egg yolk is still runny. This may require your own testing on the stove because every stove type will generate different heat and some are more immediate than others. Once you have achieved the desired egg, try to remember the time it took to cook it and you will have the perfect egg every time.
  2. For the perfect GAPS egg to ensure teh white is cooked and egg yolk runny, we recommend 3-5 minutes as shown on the egg cooking time chart.
  3. Peal the egg shell under cold water whilst it is still hot but not too hot to touch. This makes for an easier way to peal the egg with out breakage, otherwise put it in an egg cup, slice off the top and scoop it out.
  4. Add an egg to every bowl of soup.

Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is a condiment suggested to be eaten as a side dish whenever meat is consumed and especially at the end of the day when the body’s enzyme storage is depleted having already been expended on previous meals earlier in the day.  The evening meal is often the most difficult for people who suffer from […]

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Sauerkraut
This recipe is appropriate for the introduction diet from stage One onward
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Sauerkraut
Sauerkraut Equipment
  • 1 Fermentation Vessel A glass jar or crock with a weight to hold the vegetables submerged under the brine and an airlock system with a release valve to allow air to escape whilst creating an anaerobic environment. Refer to Weck images below
  • 1 Mandolin For slicing cabage (or use a knife)
Servings
Litre
Ingredients
Sauerkraut
Sauerkraut Equipment
  • 1 Fermentation Vessel A glass jar or crock with a weight to hold the vegetables submerged under the brine and an airlock system with a release valve to allow air to escape whilst creating an anaerobic environment. Refer to Weck images below
  • 1 Mandolin For slicing cabage (or use a knife)
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Instructions
  1. Thinly slice or shred the cabbage with a knife or mandolin. I like to use a mandolin.
  2. Place the shredded cabbage in a large glass bowl and add the dill (optional).
  3. For Wild Fermentation, add a generous amount of salt to the cabbage and mix it through with your hands to allow an overall coverage. Let it sit for 15 – 20 minutes to allow the salt to draw out some of the cabbage juice naturally. 5-8grams - (max 15grams) per 1kg cabbage. HINTS: Salt allows the cabbage to sweat so that juices can be extracted to create the brine. For Cultured fermentation, add the commercial culture starter as per packet instructions.
  4. Mix, massage and knead the ingredients with your hands. Bruising the cabbage this way allows the cabbage to extract a natural brine solution. Keep kneading until you have squeezed a substantial amount of juice from the mixture. Sometimes this may take 10-20 minutes. HINTS: It is beneficial to have someone with strong hands to do the kneading & massaging.
  5. Place mixture into the selected fermenting vessel and pack and push the mixture down so that the cabbage is compacted in the bottom and the juice is sitting on the top of the cabbage with a minimum of 4 - 5cm’s or 2 inches. It is important to push the cabbage down firmly so that no air is trapped and the cabbage is completely submerged in and under its own brine juice. HINTS: If for any reason the cabbage is not submerged under enough of its own juices, you may need to add a small amount of filtered water with more salt (15 gms of salt to 1 ltr).
  6. Place the weight on the top of the cabbage to keep all the cabbage submerged. Push the weight down and you will see more juice rise to the top. It is very important to ensure that all the sauerkraut is submerged under its own juice. If any bits of cabbage float up to the surface, remove them throughout the fermentation process to prevent them from going moldy.
  7. If you use a canning jar with a rubber ring top, and close the lid, be sure to burp it a few times in the first few days to release the pressure. If using the weck airlock system which has it's own release valve allowing gasses to escape without letting air into the jar, place the rubber ring around the top and clamp down the lid with the attached release valve to the top. Store in a dark place for one to two weeks (ie pantry).
  8. The sauerkraut may be consumed and ready to eat after 5-7 days but it matures better with age so it is good to wait the full two weeks unless the outside temperature is hot which will speed up the fermentation process.
  9. The sauerkraut may be stored in the fridge after 1-2 weeks of fermentation. If there is any scum or mold development on the top – remove this. The kraut remaining under the juice will be fine.
Recipe Notes

Optional: It is also nice to add a little grated carrot to your sauerkraut.

Liquorice Wheels

Adapted and inspired by the craft of Amy Sue, these delightful liquorice wheels taste like the real deal and send your kitchen into a frenzy with the adorable liquorice aroma that sets your patience to the test.  With another dehydrator recipe, you will be left with your mouth watering whilst these nutritious treats take time […]

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Liquorice Wheels
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Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 12 Hours
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Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 12 Hours
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Instructions
  1. Prepare 3-4 dehydrator trays with teflex sheets and put them aside.
  2. Remove the pits from your dates (this is easier when they are at room temperature).
  3. Grind your star anise with a mortar and pestle to a very fine powder (or use anise spice ready prepared).
  4. Add the dates to the food processor or thermomix and add the water and vanilla extract. Process the dates until they form a smooth paste. You may need to run a spoon down the sides a few times to ensure there is an even blend during the processing. When a smooth paste has formed, add the ground anise spice and briefly blend again to ensure it is all mixed evenly.
  5. Add the paste into a piping bag to create long smooth tube like lines. Keep the nozzle end close to the sheets to avoid creating wiggly lines. You may need a little practice first to see what I mean but don't worry if they are not perfect, they are still going to taste great and once they can be smoothed out slightly during the coiling process.
  6. Place the trays in the dehydrator at 115 degrees for approximately 12 hours or until they are ready for shaping but not completely done. Make sure you do not over do it. Some may need to dehydrate less than this and others may need to dehydrate a little longer.
  7. When the liquorice is pliable enough to shape into coils, gently roll them on the dehydrator sheet to un-stick them from the sheet. Start shaping your coils by starting from one end continue to curl them flat on the dehydrator sheet. (They are a little easier to do this if you take the sheet off the tray and lay the sheet flat on the bench).
  8. When the coils are tightly bound, place them onto the dehydrator mesh sheet (without the teflex sheet) to complete the drying process at the same temperature for another 8 hours. The time may differ at times requiring more or less time on different occasions. You know they are ready when they are dry and not sticky.
  9. Don't over dry them to the point that unwinding the coil causes the wheel to break.
  10. Individually wrap your liquorice wheels in baking paper and pin with a staple. If you want to get fancy, you can add your own label and put them in a special bag to give as a special gift made with love.
  11. Alternatively you can make the same recipe in one flat leather slab and cut them with scissors and roll them up. I call these Liquorice Leather Rolls. These take much less time and are easy to wrap and roll. 🙂

GAPS Basic Healing Soup

*Please refer to our meat stock recipes to create the base for this soup.  This soup recipe can be adapted to make any meat, poultry or fish and vegetable combination soup made from previously prepared meat stocks.  For the purpose of this recipe, we will be cooking the chicken and vegetable soup but you may […]

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GAPS Basic Healing Soup
*This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward *You will need previously prepared homemade meat stock for this recipe: refer to our meat stock recipes for this.
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Prep Time 50 Minutes
Cook Time 3 Hours
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Litre batch
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Vegetables
Meat & Stock
  • 1 Litre Chicken Meat Stock Refer to our meat stock recipes: or locate the link to our Chicken Meat Stock Recipe below in the notes
  • 1 Whole Chicken This was used to make the meat stock recipe and put aside to make this recipe. Alternatively just add a new chicken.
Prep Time 50 Minutes
Cook Time 3 Hours
Servings
Litre batch
Ingredients
Vegetables
Meat & Stock
  • 1 Litre Chicken Meat Stock Refer to our meat stock recipes: or locate the link to our Chicken Meat Stock Recipe below in the notes
  • 1 Whole Chicken This was used to make the meat stock recipe and put aside to make this recipe. Alternatively just add a new chicken.
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Instructions
  1. Bring some of the meat stock to boil, add chopped or sliced vegetables: onions, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, courgettes, marrow, squash, pumpkin, spinach etc. and simmer for 25-35 minutes. When on the introduction diet, you can choose any combination of available vegetables avoiding very fibrous ones, such as all varieties of cabbage and celery. All particularly fibrous parts of vegetables need to be removed, such as skin and seeds on pumpkins, zucchini and squash, remove stalk from broccoli and cauliflower and any other parts that look too fibrous.
  2. If you made your own chicken stock and saved the chicken meat for other recipes, dice the meat that you set aside and place them in the pot with the vegetables. (if you did not save the meat from your stock recipe - cook a new fresh chicken according to the recommendations shown in the stock recipe first and then pull all the meat and skin from the chicken and dice it into small pieces and add to the vegetables). Otherwise continue to cook the vegetables and meats until the vegetables are soft. Approximately 1 hour on simmer.
  3. When vegetables are well cooked, add the crushed garlic, bring to boil and turn the heat off. We want the garlic to be added at the end to be only slightly cooked to receive maximum immune benefits from it.
  4. If you are cooking for children who are fussy eaters or for babies starting out on solids, you can blend the soup which will make it easier. This recipe will generally keep in the fridge for 5 days but can also be frozen.
Recipe Notes

Click Here for the Chicken Meat Stock Recipe Link

Serving for GAPS

Serve the soup with a drizzle of cold pressed extra virgin olive oil on top (1-2 tbl sp).  Add sauerkraut or juice to the soup when ready to eat or eat  1 – 2 table spoons sauerkraut at the beginning of the meal.

Never add sauerkraut, its juice or olive oil directly to any hot food as this will kill the probiotic bacteria, enzymes and minor component nutrients.  Always wait for the food to cool at a temperature you can eat it before adding them.  The general rule is:  if you can put your finger in it, then it’s ready.  Refer to the introduction diet for the progressive introduction of sauerkraut and olive oil.

The ratio of stock, meat and vegetables is individual and dependent upon the size of the batch you wish to make.

Clinical Notes:

The introduction diet is primarily designed for people suffering with diarrhoea and that is why the chosen vegetables are low in fibre.  If you have chosen to follow the introduction diet because of leaky gut and food allergies but are more susceptible to constipation, it is important to add more fibrous vegetables like cabbage and celery.  Don’t avoid cutting off stems from broccoli etc and leave the skins and seeds on vegetables like zucchini.  You may even decide to serve up some well cooked beetroot with your soup.

Hints

  • Cut vegetables and meat into small neat sized pieces unless you plan to blend or puree it for smaller children.

Other suggested and allowable ingredients

  • Fresh or dried Italian or French mushrooms can be added to pork, lamb or beef soup to enhance the flavour. Dried mushrooms can be crushed by hand before adding to the soup
  • Chopped parsley, coriander, oregano or dill
  • A spoonful of yoghurt or sour cream (creme fraiche)
  • Red onion
  • Spring onion
  • Cooked ground liver
  • Boiled eggs (yolk still runny)
  • Raw or cooked beetroots
  • Other herbs and spices (only when digestion has started to show improvements)

 

Duck Dripping

Duck fat is an old time cooking staple in Southwest France and a secret ingredient of chefs use worldwide. Incredibly tasty with a silky mouth-feel, duck fat enhances anything it is used to cook with. The great thing about rendering your own duck fat is that you end up with a batch of cracklings—delicious to […]

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Duck Dripping
Rendered Animal Fats: Stage one appropriate onward
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Prep Time 15-20 Minutes
Cook Time 1-2 Hours
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Prep Time 15-20 Minutes
Cook Time 1-2 Hours
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Cup
Ingredients
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Instructions
Option one Dripping
  1. From one whole organic duck, remove the fat and skin and set aside. The duck meat and bones can be frozen and used in a later recipe. Alternatively you can ask your butcher for duck or chicken skins.
  2. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius and bake your duck fat on top of the dripping rack with the oven pan placed beneath to catch all the fat dripping.
  3. When all the fat is cooked in approximately two hours, remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the dripping into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Option 2 Rendering
  1. From one whole organic duck, remove the fat and skin and set aside. The duck meat and bones can be frozen and used in a later recipe. Alternatively you can ask your butcher for duck or chicken skins.
  2. Cut skin and fat into medium pieces and put into a medium heavy-bottomed pot. Add ½ cup water and simmer over medium heat until water evaporates and skin pieces are crisp and have released all their fat, about 1 hour.
  3. Remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the dripping into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Recipe Notes

Storage: Store in Ball mason wide mouthed freezer safe jars.  These are heat tempered and will not crack when you pour the lard into them.

This fat can also be made using chicken skins: just ask your butcher for a bag of chicken skins.  This can also be rendered on a low heat in a slow cooker whilst also producing tasty crunchy chicken skins for snacks.  Kids love em.

Lard & Tallow

Rendering animal fats are very simple – in this recipe we will provide three ways to render lard and tallow/suet ►Lard from Pork FAT ►Tallow & Suet from Beef or Lamb FAT Ask your butcher for a big bag of any of the above animal fats (preferably organic) ► Dripping from a Duck, or Goose […]

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Lard & Tallow
Rendered Animal Fats: Stage one appropriate onward
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Prep Time 15-20 Minutes
Cook Time 2-4 Hours
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Ingredients
Option 1: Dripping in the oven - You will need a large oven tray with a dripping rack
  • 1 Kg Raw Pork Fat Alternatives: Tallow (beef or lamb fat) cut off any excess meats
Option 2: Rendering in the oven - You will need a large oven tray
Option 3: Slow Cook Render - You will need a slow cooker
  • 1 kg Raw Pork Fat Alternatives: Tallow (beef or lamb fat) cut off any excess meats
Prep Time 15-20 Minutes
Cook Time 2-4 Hours
Servings
Mills
Ingredients
Option 1: Dripping in the oven - You will need a large oven tray with a dripping rack
  • 1 Kg Raw Pork Fat Alternatives: Tallow (beef or lamb fat) cut off any excess meats
Option 2: Rendering in the oven - You will need a large oven tray
Option 3: Slow Cook Render - You will need a slow cooker
  • 1 kg Raw Pork Fat Alternatives: Tallow (beef or lamb fat) cut off any excess meats
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Instructions
Option One: Oven Dripping
  1. Preheat the oven to 120 - 130 degrees Celsius.
  2. Trim off any meat still attached to the fat - we only want the fat. A little bit of meat left on the fat is harmless as it will drop out during the rendering process, however it will change the flavour.
  3. Place the fat pieces on your dripping rack and sit your dripping rack on or inside your oven pan.
  4. Render the fat for approximately 2-3 hours. The liquid fat will drip from the large piece of fat into the bottom pan.
  5. Remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the lard into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Option Two: Oven Render
  1. Preheat the oven to 120 degrees Celsius.
  2. Trim off any meat still attached to the fat - we only want the fat. A little bit of meat left on the fat is harmless as it will drop out during the rendering process, however it will change the flavour.
  3. Cut your lard or tallow into small pieces (approximately 1 inch cubes) and place into your oven dish.
  4. Pour the water into the oven dish, this will reduce the lard or tallow from burning on the edges and the water will evaporate during the process.
  5. Place the oven dish inside and cover with a lid.
  6. Render for approximately 2 – 2 ½ hours whilst attending to it by stirring occasionally with a steel spoon. The fat cubes will gradually release its fat in liquid form whilst becoming crisp and shriveled. If you notice that the water has not yet evaporated, you can increase the temperature to 165 degrees Celsius and keep it uncovered for ten minutes.
  7. Remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the lard into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Option 3: Slow Cooker
  1. Trim off any meat still attached to the fat - we only want the fat. A little bit of meat left on the fat is harmless as it will drop out during the rendering process, however it will change the flavour.
  2. Chop your fat into tiny small pieces. Alternatively you can mince the fat in a food processor or thermomix, however it is important to note that your fat will need to be frozen before you mince it or it will result in a slimy mess and clog the blades.
  3. Place the fat into your slow cooker. Turn it onto the lowest temperature and cook for 3 - 4 hours.
  4. Cooking times will vary depending on temperature, volume and size of the fat pieces but a general rule is to cook until you have small browned cracklings in a bath of clear fat.
  5. Remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the lard into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Recipe Notes

Storage: Store in Ball mason wide mouthed freezer safe jars.  These are heat tempered and will not crack when you pour the lard into them.

Coconut Vanilla Fudge

This recipe will show you how to make your own sensational additive free chocolate. CONTAINS NO nuts, dairy, sugar, eggs or other additives.With a soft fudge coconut cream and vanilla flavoured centre, slightly coated in homemade dairy free chocolate, these old family favourites will be consumed quickly in our home. You can make them rough […]

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Coconut Vanilla Fudge
This recipe is appropriate for people who are following the full GAPS Diet and who do not have serious digestive issues.
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Prep Time 35 Minutes
Passive Time 45 Minutes
Servings
Slices
Ingredients
Coconut Cream Filling
Prep Time 35 Minutes
Passive Time 45 Minutes
Servings
Slices
Ingredients
Coconut Cream Filling
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Instructions
Cococnut Cream Filling
  1. Mix all coconut meat ingredients in a saucepan on medium heat until all ingredients is well combined and melted and then mix in a food processor to grind the dessicated coconut a little finer.
  2. Line a 8×6 inch dish with bleach free baking paper and pour the ingredients into the dish and push down flat.
  3. Place the coconut meat mixture dish into the freezer and leave for 4 hours or overnight.
  4. When the mixture has set hard, pull the sides of the baking paper up to pull out the coconut mixture out of the dish and place it on a chopping board. With a long sharp knife, carefully cut the coconut fudge middle meat into even squares.
  5. Place the squares into a container with a lid back into the freezer for preparation for the chocolate coating step.
Choc Coating
  1. Simmer some water on a low heat in a saucepan and place a glass bowl over the simmering water. Add the cacao butter to the glass bowl and melt the cacao butter completely. (CAUTION: Keep the heat at a low temperature so that the steam does not cause any water residue within the glass bowl and make sure all your utensils and materials do not have any water on them because any water contaminating the mixture will cause lumps and clumps and spoil the smooth chocolate result).
  2. Once melted, turn off the heat and add the cocao powder gradually whilst stirring continuously with a bone dry whisk until mixed well with no lumps. Add honey and vanilla essence and continue to whisk.
  3. When the mixture is lovely and smooth it is ready for the coconut meat fudge dipping.
Coating with chocolate
  1. Take the chopped coconut meat squares from the freezer and place one square on top of a fork.
  2. Dip the square into the chocolate so that it covers only half of the slice. (you can cover the entire slice if you want to and this can be done by dropping it into the choc mixture and then lifting it with the fork from the bottom and let the excess chocolate drip off.
  3. The cold coconut squares will start to harden the outer layer of chocolate as you lay the squares down onto some bleach free baking paper on a tray to set.
  4. Place the choc covered squares into the fridge for 10 minutes to set. These are reasonably stable at room temperature.
Recipe Notes

OPTIONAL: You may wish to add a teaspoon of organic mint flavour to the mixture if desired.

Crunchy Nut Seed Fruit Combo Bites or Bars

This recipe is a favourite and can resemble a crunchy nut and seed fruit bar or equivalent bite sized snack. When I make the bars, I tend to spread the ingredients into a thickness similar to a museli bar but when I like to make smaller bite sized pieces, I spread the ingredients further to […]

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Crunchy Nut Seed Fruit Combo Bites or Bars
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Instructions
  1. You may wish to lightly grind some of the nuts to break them up a little but they can be left as they are
  2. Soak all seeds and nuts overnight and rinse them under filtered water in a sieve
  3. Combine and mix all ingredients with your hands or a big spoon in a bowl
  4. The flax seed may need a little more draining in a sieve before you add them to the remaining of the ingredients. These will work as a binding agent to keep all your ingredients together.
  5. When all is combined simply spread the ingredients on a dehydrator sheet (1 cm thick) and Dry at 135 degrees F or 57 ◦C for 20-24 hrs
  6. You may dehydrate for longer if you want a crispier result or intend to make thicker nut/seed bars
  7. When completed, simply break into bite size snacks or cut specific portions with a knife. You may also wish to break it up further to make a muesli mix for breakfast with your yoghurt.
  8. You can explore any nut fruit and seed combo that you desire. Enjoy!

Chicken Vegetable Pie

You will need 4 mini pie pots (size 4cm width opening from the top) This is a delicious meal on it’s own, served with a salad and fermented vegetables on the side.  It is a great winter warmer for all the family. Print Recipe Chicken Vegetable Pie Votes: 0 Rating: 0 You: Rate this recipe! […]

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Chicken Vegetable Pie
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Course Main Dishes
Cuisine Full GAPS Diet
Prep Time 20 Mins
Cook Time 40 Mins
Passive Time 45 Mins
Servings
Pies
Ingredients
Pie Filling
Course Main Dishes
Cuisine Full GAPS Diet
Prep Time 20 Mins
Cook Time 40 Mins
Passive Time 45 Mins
Servings
Pies
Ingredients
Pie Filling
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Instructions
Pie Pasty Prep
  1. Preheat the oven to 150 Degrees Celsius
  2. Place all pie pastry ingredients into a bowl and kneed with your hands, massaging and squeezing the ingredients until it forms a tight ball. You can also get this effect very quickly if you place all ingredients in a thermomix for 20 seconds on speed 4.
  3. Roll the dough flat so that it is approximately 1cm thick. Cut out sections of the dough to fill 4 mini pie pots (size 4cm width opening from the top) and press them into the bottom and side walls with your fingers. Make sure to leave enough dough to make the lids.
  4. With the remaining pastry and cut offs, roll out the dough again and cut out 4 lids.
  5. Place the bottoms of the pie crust pressed into the pie pots into the oven and cook for 15 - 20 minutes. Place the lids into the fridge for later.
Preparing the Filling
  1. Bring to boil the chicken breast in two cups of chicken stock.
  2. When chicken is cooked, remove the chicken and dice it up into small bite sized pieces for the pie.
  3. In a separate fry pan, saute the onion and garlic.
  4. Chop pumpkin and carrots to small bite sized pieces. Cut the heads from the broccolini and add them to the chicken stock in the pot along with the carrot and pumpkin pieces..
  5. Also add the onion and garlic along with the chicken to the chicken stock.
  6. Add all remaining chicken filling ingredients and bring to the boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer on a low heat for 45 minutes.
Putting it all together
  1. When all ingredients are cooked and ready, remove from the stoce and prepare the pie bottoms for filling.
  2. Evenly scoop the chicken pie filling into each pie pot crust filling.
  3. take the pie crust filling lids from the fridge and place them over the top of each pot. Pinch the sides of the pastry to connect the base of the pie with the pie tops. alternatively you can use a fork to do this.
  4. Spear the tops of the pie with a fork and place the pots on a tray in the oven. Cook for 20 minutes ( or until lightly golden brown) at 150 Degrees Celcius.
  5. Remove and let cool for ten minutes before serving.

Choc Top Minty Moments – Cheesecake Medallions

This recipe is an absolute delight if you love chocolate and mint with a splash of coconut cream flavour on a delicious crumbly biscuit bottom.  If you don’t like mint, simply leave that out of the recipe.  Although this recipe is not difficult, it does take some time to prepare but the time taken is […]

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Choc Top Minty Moments Cheesecake Medallions
This recipe is appropriate for people who are following the Full GAPS Diet.
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Prep Time 1 Hour
Passive Time 40 Minutes
Servings
Cups