Turkey/Chicken Leg Casserole

This recipe is an extract from the GAPS Book as a staple for the Introduction Diet as well as the full GAPS Diet.  It is an easy delicious meal to prepare and is easily modified to cater for need or preference.  Please refer to the clinical notes for people undertaking the Introduction Diet Stages for […]

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Turkey/Chicken Leg Casserole
This recipe is appropriate for the Introduction Diet from Stage Two onward, however if sever digestive disturbances are experienced, please refer to the clinical notes below for modifications.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2.45 hours
Servings
People
Ingredients
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2.45 hours
Servings
People
Ingredients
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Instructions
  1. In a large oval casserole pot, add the stock, water, slat, tomato puree, cayenne pepper and herbs.
  2. Mix well and then add the turkey or chicken legs
  3. The tops of the turkey legs will be exposed from the other ingredients. Brush the legs with some duck fat and lightly salt the legs.
  4. Add Diced onion, celery and crushed garlic to a fry pan with a tablespoon of duck fat and saute until soft and then add to the casserole pot.
  5. Add the casserole pot to a preheated oven at 160 Degrees Celsius WITH LID OFF for 2 hours and 45 minutes.
  6. After the Casserole has been cooking for 2 hours, add the chopped vegetables. Mix them well into the sauce and leave cooking for a further 45 minutes.
  7. When the vegetables are cooked, remove the casserole from the oven. Serve the meat and vegetables on a dish and pour a few tablespoons of the sauce over the top.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Fibrous vegetables such as celery must be avoided for people with severed digestive disturbances such as diarrhoea.  Broccoli and Cauliflower stalks must be completely removed only using the heads and vegetables containing any seeds, or skins must be removed.

Liquorice Wheels

Adapted and inspired by the craft of Amy Sue, these delightful liquorice wheels taste like the real deal and send your kitchen into a frenzy with the adorable liquorice aroma that sets your patience to the test.  With another dehydrator recipe, you will be left with your mouth watering whilst these nutritious treats take time […]

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Liquorice Wheels
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Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 12 Hours
Servings
Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 12 Hours
Servings
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Instructions
  1. Prepare 3-4 dehydrator trays with teflex sheets and put them aside.
  2. Remove the pits from your dates (this is easier when they are at room temperature).
  3. Grind your star anise with a mortar and pestle to a very fine powder (or use anise spice ready prepared).
  4. Add the dates to the food processor or thermomix and add the water and vanilla extract. Process the dates until they form a smooth paste. You may need to run a spoon down the sides a few times to ensure there is an even blend during the processing. When a smooth paste has formed, add the ground anise spice and briefly blend again to ensure it is all mixed evenly.
  5. Add the paste into a piping bag to create long smooth tube like lines. Keep the nozzle end close to the sheets to avoid creating wiggly lines. You may need a little practice first to see what I mean but don't worry if they are not perfect, they are still going to taste great and once they can be smoothed out slightly during the coiling process.
  6. Place the trays in the dehydrator at 115 degrees for approximately 12 hours or until they are ready for shaping but not completely done. Make sure you do not over do it. Some may need to dehydrate less than this and others may need to dehydrate a little longer.
  7. When the liquorice is pliable enough to shape into coils, gently roll them on the dehydrator sheet to un-stick them from the sheet. Start shaping your coils by starting from one end continue to curl them flat on the dehydrator sheet. (They are a little easier to do this if you take the sheet off the tray and lay the sheet flat on the bench).
  8. When the coils are tightly bound, place them onto the dehydrator mesh sheet (without the teflex sheet) to complete the drying process at the same temperature for another 8 hours. The time may differ at times requiring more or less time on different occasions. You know they are ready when they are dry and not sticky.
  9. Don't over dry them to the point that unwinding the coil causes the wheel to break.
  10. Individually wrap your liquorice wheels in baking paper and pin with a staple. If you want to get fancy, you can add your own label and put them in a special bag to give as a special gift made with love.
  11. Alternatively you can make the same recipe in one flat leather slab and cut them with scissors and roll them up. I call these Liquorice Leather Rolls. These take much less time and are easy to wrap and roll. 🙂

Fish Stock

Compared to the other stocks, fish stock is easier to make because there is no roasting or long cooking times required. The DHA and EPA make this stock more beneficial than other meat stock. These Omega-3 fatty acids are the most important nutrients for brain function. Fish stock will produce it’s own gelatin and other […]

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Fish Stock
*This fish stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2-4 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
3 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Fish Meat and Bone
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2-4 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
3 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Fish Meat and Bone
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Instructions
  1. Place the fish bones, heads and fins into a large pot and fill it up with 3 litres of filtered water.
  2. Add the onion and garlic to the pot, along with the bay leaf, black pepper corns and salt.
  3. Add the fennel, parsley and juice from the lemon.
  4. Add the apple cider vinegar and bring to a boil. Skim off any scum that rises to the top. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for at least 2 - 4 hours.
  5. After cooking for the recommended time above, remove the bones and any meat by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve and discard all the vegetables and bones caught in the sieve.
  6. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones, fins, heads and vegetables added.
  7. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen for several months.
Recipe Notes

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key!  In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand.  I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up.   This can be added directly to the cook pot for use.  If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost.  Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them.  These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Fish Stock Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, fins and heads.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

https://shop.gapsaustralia.com.au/freezer-safe-mason-stock-storage-jar-475ml/

Pork Meat Stock

It is important to understand the difference between meat and bone broth. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Simply put, meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours or more. […]

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Pork Meat Stock
Remember, a rich meat stock is what we are seeking to make on the introduction stages, not bone broth until you graduate to the Full GAPS Diet Program. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Pork Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 3-4 items from this group below
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Pork Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 3-4 items from this group below
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Instructions
  1. Your selected meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it. Ask your butcher to cut some large tubular marrow bones so that the marrow can be easily accessed like that shown in the image.
  2. Lightly brown the meat cuts in lard or ghee in a frypan or . This creates added flavour to the stock. Do not cook it, just lightly sear it with a sprinkle of salt to create flavour.
  3. Place the bones and meat joints into a large pot and fill it up with 4 litres of filtered water.
  4. Cut the onions into halves or quarters and add them to the pot along with roughly chopped carrots and crushed garlic cloves. If you are following the introduction diet stages, we recommend you avoid the fibrous vegetables such as celery at this time.
  5. Add salt to taste at the beginning of cooking and about a teaspoon of black peppercorns.
  6. Add apple cider vinegar and fresh oregano.
  7. Bring to a boil and skim and skim off any scum that rises to the top. Then reduce the heat and leave on the stove at a low simmer for about 3–6 hours. If you are cooking in the oven, cook at 150°C for 3 hours. If using crock pot, cook on high for 2 hours, then on low for 6 -8 hours. This is the measured cooking time frame to make your nutrient meat stock. Bone stock without the meat cuts are usually longer. The longer you cook the bone stock the more nutrients and the softer the bones become for fishing out marrow.
  8. After cooking for the recommended time above, remove the meat, marrow and bones by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve. You can do this by collecting the stock under the strainer into a larger pot. Strip off all the meat and soft tissues from the bones as best as you can and extract the bone marrow out of the large tubular bones while they are still warm: to do that bang the bone on a thick wooden chopping board. The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and these should be put aside with the meat that has been stripped from the bones to add later to soups or as a meal. It is also ok for the patient to eat the marrow and soft tissue direct from the bones.
  9. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones and vegetables added. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen. The bones can be frozen and later used again to make bone broth.
Recipe Notes

If you wish to make bone broth/stock later, you can keep the bones by storing them in the freezer and cook the ingredients for longer to extract more nutrients from the bones.  Refer to our Bone Broth Recipe to make this but remember not to introduce bone broth until you are on Full GAPS Diet or simply continue with the nutritious meat and gelatin stocks.

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key! In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand. I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up. This can be added directly to the cook pot for use. If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost. Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them. These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Butcher supplies for meat stock

The ratio of ingredients is individual and dependant on the size of the batch you wish to make but keep in mind that some stock should be reserved for drinking and some for making your batch for soup.  The remainder of your ingredients will depend on what type of meat stock you are making.  Here is a list of bone selections you can ask for at your organic butcher shop.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Game Selections

  • Large tubular marrow bones
  • Gelatinous meats
  • Meaty rib bones
  • Osso Buco cuts
  • Knuckle bones
  • Shanks
  • Neck bones
  • Tail bones
  • Trotters
  • Joints
  • Ears

Poultry Selections

  • Whole chicken & extra chicken frames
  • Feet from one chicken
  • Gizards & giblets
  • Spatchcock
  • Pheasants
  • Pigeon
  • Goose
  • Duck

Fish Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, hoofs, trotters and soft animal tissues from gelatinous meats.
  • The celery sticks should be avoided for patients in the introductions diet stages.  These can be added later on full gaps for added stock flavour.  They can be freshly cut as shown in the instructions or sauteed in a pan with onion and garlic prior to adding to the pot  for added flavour.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Charting the highest source of essential nutrients

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

 

Chicken Meat Stock

It is important to understand the difference between meat and bone broth. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Simply put, meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours or more. […]

Print Recipe
Chicken Meat Stock
Remember, a rich meat stock is what we are seeking to make on the introduction stages, not bone broth until you graduate to the Full GAPS Diet Program. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward. Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 1.5 -3 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic ingredients
Chicken or other Poultry Stock
Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 1.5 -3 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic ingredients
Chicken or other Poultry Stock
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Instructions
  1. Place chicken frames, feet, gizzards and whole chicken into a large pot and fill it up with 4 Litres of filtered water, add natural unprocessed salt to your taste at the beginning of cooking and about a teaspoon of black peppercorns, roughly crushed (optional – pepper sometimes too hot for children). Apple cider vinegar can be added at this point if you are using it.
  2. Add fresh oregano and peppercorns.
  3. Bring to boil on the stove and skim and discard any floating scum on the top. Cover and simmer on a low heat for 1 ½ -3 hours. If you are using a crock pot, cook for 1 hour on high, then 6 hours on low.
  4. After cooking for the recommended time, remove the meat and bones by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve. You can do this by collecting the stock under the strainer into a larger pot or large pyrex jug. Strip off all the meat and soft tissues from the bones as best as you can and put aside. The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and these should be put aside with the meat that has been stripped from the bones to add later to the soup. It is also good for the patient to eat the marrow and soft tissue direct from the bones as a meal.
  5. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones and vegetables added. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen.
Recipe Notes

If you wish to make bone broth/stock later, you can keep the bones by storing them in the freezer and cook the ingredients for longer to extract more nutrients from the bones.  Refer to our Bone Broth Recipe to make this but remember not to introduce bone broth until you are on Full GAPS Diet or simply continue with the nutritious meat and gelatin stocks.

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key! In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand. I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up. This can be added directly to the cook pot for use. If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost. Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them. These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Butcher supplies for meat stock

The ratio of ingredients is individual and dependant on the size of the batch you wish to make but keep in mind that some stock should be reserved for drinking and some for making your batch for soup.  The remainder of your ingredients will depend on what type of meat stock you are making.  Here is a list of bone selections you can ask for at your organic butcher shop.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Game Selections

  • Large tubular marrow bones
  • Gelatinous meats
  • Meaty rib bones
  • Osso Buco cuts
  • Knuckle bones
  • Shanks
  • Neck bones
  • Tail bones
  • Trotters
  • Joints
  • Ears

Poultry Selections

  • Whole chicken & extra chicken frames
  • Feet from one chicken
  • Gizards & giblets
  • Spatchcock
  • Pheasants
  • Pigeon
  • Goose
  • Duck

Fish Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts for fish stock:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during the introduction diet stages.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, hoofs, trotters and soft animal tissues from gelatinous meats.
  • The celery sticks should be avoided for patients in the introductions diet stages.  These can be added later on full gaps for added stock flavour.  They can be freshly cut as shown in the instructions or sauteed in a pan with onion and garlic prior to adding to the pot  for added flavour.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Charting the highest source of essential nutrients

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

 

Lamb Meat Stock

It is important to understand the difference between meat and bone broth. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Simply put, meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours or more. […]

Print Recipe
Lamb Meat Stock
Remember, a rich meat stock is what we are seeking to make on the introduction stages, not bone broth until you graduate to the Full GAPS Diet Program. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward. Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Lamb Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 3-4 items from this group below
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Lamb Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 3-4 items from this group below
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
  1. Your selected meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it. Ask your butcher to cut some large tubular marrow bones so that the marrow can be easily accessed like that shown in the image.
  2. Lightly brown the meat cuts in tallow or ghee in a frypan or . This creates added flavour to the stock. Do not cook it, just lightly sear it with a sprinkle of salt to create flavour.
  3. Place the bones and meat joints into a large pot and fill it up with 4 litres of filtered water.
  4. Cut the onions into halves or quarters and add them to the pot along with roughly chopped carrots and crushed garlic cloves. If you are following the introduction diet stages, we recommend you avoid the fibrous vegetables such as celery at this time.
  5. Add salt to taste at the beginning of cooking and about a teaspoon of black peppercorns.
  6. Add apple cider vinegar and fresh oregano.
  7. Bring to a boil and skim off any scum that rises to the top. Then reduce the heat and leave on the stove at a low simmer for about 3–6 hours. If you are cooking in the oven, cook at 150°C for 3 hours. If using crock pot, cook on high for 2 hours, then on low for 6 hours. This is the measured cooking time frame to make your nutrient meat stock. Bone stock without the meat cuts are usually longer. The longer you cook the bone stock the more nutrients and the softer the bones become for fishing out marrow.
  8. After cooking for the recommended time above, remove the meat, marrow and bones by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve. You can do this by collecting the stock under the strainer into a larger pot. Strip off all the meat and soft tissues from the bones as best as you can and extract the bone marrow out of the large tubular bones while they are still warm: to do that bang the bone on a thick wooden chopping board. The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and these should be put aside with the meat that has been stripped from the bones to add later to soups or as a meal. It is also ok for the patient to eat the marrow and soft tissue direct from the bones.
  9. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones and vegetables added. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen. The bones can be frozen and later used again to make bone broth.
Recipe Notes

If you wish to make bone broth/stock later, you can keep the bones by storing them in the freezer and cook the ingredients for longer to extract more nutrients from the bones.  Refer to our Bone Broth Recipe to make this but remember not to introduce bone broth until you are on Full GAPS Diet or simply continue with the nutritious meat and gelatin stocks.

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key! In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand. I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up. This can be added directly to the cook pot for use. If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost. Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them. These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Butcher supplies for meat stock

The ratio of ingredients is individual and dependant on the size of the batch you wish to make but keep in mind that some stock should be reserved for drinking and some for making your batch for soup.  The remainder of your ingredients will depend on what type of meat stock you are making.  Here is a list of bone selections you can ask for at your organic butcher shop.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Game Selections

  • Large tubular marrow bones
  • Gelatinous meats
  • Meaty rib bones
  • Osso Buco cuts
  • Knuckle bones
  • Shanks
  • Neck bones
  • Tail bones
  • Trotters
  • Joints
  • Ears

Poultry Selections

  • Whole chicken & extra chicken frames
  • Feet from one chicken
  • Gizards & giblets
  • Spatchcock
  • Pheasants
  • Pigeon
  • Goose
  • Duck

Fish Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, hoofs, trotters and soft animal tissues from gelatinous meats.
  • The celery sticks should be avoided for patients in the introductions diet stages.  These can be added later on full gaps for added stock flavour.  They can be freshly cut as shown in the instructions or sauteed in a pan with onion and garlic prior to adding to the pot  for added flavour.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Charting the highest source of essential nutrients

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

 

Beef Meat Stock

It is important to understand the difference between meat and bone broth. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Simply put, meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours or more. […]

Print Recipe
Beef Meat Stock
Remember, a rich meat stock is what we are seeking to make on the introduction stages, not bone broth until you graduate to the Full GAPS Diet Program. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward. Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Beef Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 4-5 items from this group below
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Beef Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 4-5 items from this group below
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
  1. Your selected meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it. Osso Bucco cuts as shown in the image are perfect for this, along with the other meaty bones and joints listed in the recipe. Lightly brown the meat cuts in tallow or ghee in a frypan or . This creates added flavour to the stock. Do not cook it, just lightly sear it with a sprinkle of salt to create flavour.
  2. Place the bones and meat joints into a large pot and fill it up with 4 litres of filtered water.
  3. Cut the onions into halves or quarters and add them to the pot along with roughly chopped carrots and crushed garlic cloves. If you are following the introduction diet stages, we recommend you avoid the fibrous vegetables such as celery at this time.
  4. Add salt to taste at the beginning of cooking and about a teaspoon of black peppercorns.
  5. Add apple cider vinegar and fresh oregano.
  6. Bring to a boil and skim off any scum that rises to the top. Then reduce the heat and leave on the stove at a low simmer for about 3–6 hours. If you are cooking in the oven, cook at 150°C for 3 hours. If using crock pot, cook on high for 2 hours, then on low for 8–10 hours. This is the measured cooking time frame to make your nutrient meat stock. Bone stock without the meat cuts are usually longer. The longer you cook the bone stock the more nutrients and the softer the bones become for fishing out marrow.
  7. After cooking for the recommended time above, remove the meat, marrow and bones by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve. You can do this by collecting the stock under the strainer into a larger pot. Strip off all the meat and soft tissues from the bones as best as you can and extract the bone marrow out of the large tubular bones while they are still warm: to do that bang the bone on a thick wooden chopping board. The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and these should be put aside with the meat that has been stripped from the bones to add later to soups or as a meal. It is also ok for the patient to eat the marrow and soft tissue direct from the bones.
  8. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones and vegetables added. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen. The bones can be frozen and later used again to make bone broth.
Recipe Notes

If you wish to make bone broth/stock later, you can keep the bones by storing them in the freezer and cook the ingredients for longer to extract more nutrients from the bones.  Refer to our Bone Broth Recipe to make this but remember not to introduce bone broth until you are on Full GAPS Diet or simply continue with the nutritious meat and gelatin stocks.

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key! In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand. I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up. This can be added directly to the cook pot for use. If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost. Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them. These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Butcher supplies for meat stock

The ratio of ingredients is individual and dependant on the size of the batch you wish to make but keep in mind that some stock should be reserved for drinking and some for making your batch for soup.  The remainder of your ingredients will depend on what type of meat stock you are making.  Here is a list of bone selections you can ask for at your organic butcher shop.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Game Selections

  • Large tubular marrow bones
  • Gelatinous meats
  • Meaty rib bones
  • Osso Buco cuts
  • Knuckle bones
  • Shanks
  • Neck bones
  • Tail bones
  • Trotters
  • Joints
  • Ears

Poultry Selections

  • Whole chicken & extra chicken frames
  • Feet from one chicken
  • Gizards & giblets
  • Spatchcock
  • Pheasants
  • Pigeon
  • Goose
  • Duck

Fish Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, hoofs, trotters and soft animal tissues from gelatinous meats.
  • The celery sticks should be avoided for patients in the introductions diet stages.  These can be added later on full gaps for added stock flavour.  They can be freshly cut as shown in the instructions or sauteed in a pan with onion and garlic prior to adding to the pot  for added flavour.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Charting the highest source of essential nutrients

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

 

Fermented Sauerkraut Juice

What if you run out of sauerkraut juice on the introduction diet? Sauerkraut juice is a by-product from making sauerkraut.  There is often not enough to cater for the introduction diet stages when you purchase sauerkraut or when you make your own so here is a recipe that will help you keep up with your […]

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Sauerkraut Juice
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Instructions
  1. Fresh press your cabbage to make close to a litre of cabbage juice.
  2. And add either a cup of whey dripped from your yoghurt or kefir or use some yoghurt starter or vegetable culture.
  3. A cup of water can be added to top it up.
  4. Ferment the juice on the bench for 24 – 48 hours at room temperature and you will notice it will become slightly carbonated or effervescent. It is good to use a glass container that is sealed tight. Be sure to release any gas build up in the bottle by loosening the jar and tightening it again during the fermentation process.
Recipe Notes

Store in the fridge when fermentation is complete.

Activating Nuts/Seeds for Flour

What are Activated Nuts? Activated nuts have been soaked in water and salt for a period of time, which starts off the germination or sprouting process, then dehydrated at a low temperature. Soaking increases the nutrient value of the nuts along with breaking down the problematic compounds that help enhance their digestibility. Nuts and Seeds […]

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Activating Nuts/Seeds for Flour
This recipe is appropriate from Stage 6 on the Introductions Diet
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Prep Time 2-12 hrs
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Instructions
  1. In a large bowl place your nuts or seed of choice.
  2. Dissolve salt in enough water to cover the amount of nuts/seeds you are activating.
  3. Cover with the salt water solution.
  4. Soak the nuts or seeds for the specified time according to the chart below (see soaking time chart)
  5. Strain and rinse the nuts when the specified time has lapsed.
  6. Spread the nuts or seeds over a dehydrator rack, or baking tray.
  7. Place in the oven on a low heat (90 degrees) or dehydrator until completely dry and the moisture is removed. The dehydrator is a longer drying process but helps to keep activated nuts active. The oven can stop the germination process, however it will get the job done in drying the nuts and seeds after they enzyme inhibitors have been removed.
  8. Eat the activated nuts as they are or make flour from them by grinding the nuts in a strong blender like a vitamix or thermo until you have a flour like consistency.
  9. Store nuts, seeds or nut flours in an air tight container.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Try fermenting nut/seed flour or nut/seed milk if nuts and seeds continue to be a bit of a problem.

Nut and Seed Soaking Chart

Print Recipe Nut and Seed Soaking Chart Votes: 0 Rating: 0 You: Rate this recipe! Course Baking at home, Miscellaneous Cuisine Full GAPS Diet, GAPS Baby: Introducing Solids, GAPS Introduction Stages, Stage 6 – onward Servings Ingredients 2-3 Cups Organic Nuts or Seeds1 Tbs Celtic or Himalayan Sea Salt1 Litre Filtered water Course Baking at […]

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Nut and Seed Soaking Chart
Instructions
  1. Almonds 12 Hours 1 tablespoon salt
  2. Brazil Nuts 2 Hours 1 tablespoon salt
  3. Cashews 2 Hours 1 tablespoon salt
  4. Chia Seeds 2 Hours No salt
  5. Flax Seeds 2 Hours No salt
  6. Hazel Nuts 8 Hours 1 tablespoon salt
  7. Macadamia Nuts 2 Hours 1 tablespoon salt
  8. Pecans 8 Hours 2 teaspoons salt
  9. Pine Nuts 2 Hours 1 tablespoon salt
  10. Pumpkin Seeds 6 Hours 2 tablespoons salt
  11. Sesame Seeds un-hulled 6 Hours 1 tablespoon salt
  12. Sunflower Seeds 4 Hours 2 tablespoons salt
  13. Walnuts 8 Hours 2 teaspoons salt
  14. Wild Peanuts 8 Hours 1 tablespoon salt
  15. See other recipe 'Activating Nuts/Seeds for Flour' for instructions to soak and sprout seeds to make flour.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Nuts and Seeds are fibrous and should not be introduced for GAPS patients until digestive symptoms have shown some signs of improvement. The introduction diet provides a slow introduction to nuts by starting with nut butter followed by baking with nut flour and finally nuts for snacks themselves with encouragement to prepare them and chew them well. The sensitivity test is advised to be carried out first for those who suspect a true nut allergy, however there are many people who express their intolerance for nuts during the introduction diet who may need to determine themselves whether to wait until further healing takes place before introducing them.

Selecting organic nuts and seeds and preparing them by soaking and sometimes blanching them (skins removed) often makes all the difference for a GAPS patient to better tolerate them.  Many GAPS patients have a toxic overload and cannot tolerate even the smallest amount of chemicals or pesticides in their system and this is why organic serves to be a better option.

In addition to crop chemicals, nuts and seeds contain their own toxic substances known as enzyme inhibitors and phytates (phytic acid).  These toxins can play havoc in the digestive system, blocking nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, copper iron and especially zinc.  Enzyme inhibitors in particular, are contained on the skins or surrounds of nuts and seeds and they are especially apparent in nuts with brown skins like almonds.  Their purpose serves as a protective layer to naturally prevent animals and insects from consuming them so that they have the opportunity to germinate and sprout into a plant. Soaking nuts and seeds in warm salty water overnight will activate enzymes that neutralise enzyme inhibitors and also breakdown a large portion of phytic acid that allow the nutrients to be better absorbed in the digestive system. This soaking preparation process is often referred to as activating nuts and seeds.

Nut Seed Milk

Preparation in making nut milk is important, especially for people who already have digestive problems and food sensitivities. Almonds (as well as most other nuts) contain toxic substances known as enzyme inhibitors and phytates (phytic acid). These toxins can play havoc in the digestive system, blocking nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, copper iron and especially […]

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Nut Seed Milk
This recipe is appropriate for the Introduction diet when nuts have been successfully introduced and tolerated from stage 4 onward.
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Prep Time 5 Minutes
Passive Time 14 Hours
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Prep Time 5 Minutes
Passive Time 14 Hours
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Instructions
Part 1 - Soaking
  1. Add 3 cups of filtered water to a jug or bowl and mix in 1 tablespoon of salt
  2. Add 1 cup of almonds and cover with a tea towel or cheese cloth
  3. Soak the nuts in the salt water brine for 12 hours
  4. Rinse the nuts under filtered water to remove salt residue and discard the salt water brine
  5. Place the nuts in a clean jug or bowl and add 1 - 2 teaspoons of flaxseeds and 3 – 4 cups of water and place in the fridge for 2 – 3 hours. Adding the flaxseeds will allow the milk to thicken a little more. Exclude this step if you have no concern for thickness
  6. If you wish to add a little sweetener to the milk, this will be the stage that you will need to add the pitted dates to the mixture to soak for a few hours. This is optional
Part 1 - Blending and Straining
  1. Add the soaked nut mixture from the fridge (including the water) to a good strong blender, vitamix or thermo mixer and blend for as long as it takes to break down the size of the nuts into a pulp consistency
  2. Place a nut milk bag or cheesecloth over a bowl and pour the milk mixture through the cheesecloth or nut milk bag like a strainer
  3. When all the pulp and liquid has been strained through the nut milk bag or cheesecloth, squeeze any excess milk from the pulp mixture with your hands, allowing the milk to drain through the cloth. If you find that the milk is too rich, simply add more filtered water
  4. Store in the fridge for 2 – 3 days.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Why soak nuts and seeds?

  • To neutralize enzyme inhibitors
  • To remove or reduce phytates
  • To encourage the production of beneficial enzymes

Apple Puree

Apple Pure is introduced in the Introduction Diet on stage 5.  Apple Pure for GAPS is an easy way to disguise fats.  GAPS is a high fat diet so we want to add fats to everything and apple puree is a good way to deliver it. We usually add duck fat, ghee or coconut oil.  […]

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Apple Puree
This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet from stage 5 onward
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Prep Time 5-10 Minutes
Cook Time 15-20 Minutes
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Fruit
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Prep Time 5-10 Minutes
Cook Time 15-20 Minutes
Servings
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Ingredients
Fruit
Other
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Instructions
  1. Peel and core the ripe apples and slice thinly into your stainless steel cook pot. An apple slinky is great at doing this job.
  2. Add the water and cook the apples on low whilst stirring occasionally. You may place the lid on top to create steam in the cooking process.
  3. When the apples have become soft, take the pan off the stove and mash with a vegetable masher.
  4. Add a couple of tablespoons of ghee or duck fat or coconut fat (depending on what you have introduced) and blend with the apple.
  5. Store the stewed apples in the fridge.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Start to introduce with a few spoonful’s  a day and gradually increase the amount if there are no reactions.

Fermented Almond Flour

If the introduction of nuts or nut flour persists to be a problem for people starting the GAPS Diet, you may wish to ferment the nut flour itself. Both nuts and seeds contain phytates, phenols and oxalates etc and these can make it difficult for some people (not all) to digest whilst their gut is […]

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Fermented Almond Flour
Fermenting Almond Flour
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Prep Time 5 mins
Passive Time 24 hours
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cups
Ingredients
Fermenting mixture
  • 2-3 cups Blanched almond flour Organic - quantity here is dependant upon how much you plan to use for the recipe intended
  • 1 cup Whey This is the dripped liquid from your yoghurt - see whey recipe
  • 2 cups Filtered water
Special equipment
Prep Time 5 mins
Passive Time 24 hours
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Fermenting mixture
  • 2-3 cups Blanched almond flour Organic - quantity here is dependant upon how much you plan to use for the recipe intended
  • 1 cup Whey This is the dripped liquid from your yoghurt - see whey recipe
  • 2 cups Filtered water
Special equipment
Fermenting Almond Flour
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Instructions
  1. Add the almond flour into a bowl or dish
  2. Mix filtered water with a cup of whey and pour over the almond flour
  3. Leave the bowl or dish on the kitchen bench top at room temperature for 24 hours.
  4. When 24 hours have passed, drain the flour through a cheescloth and use the drained flour directly in baking.

Fermented Fish

This is a very easy and nutritious probiotic meal to prepare. Avoid Farmed Fish Farmed fish are generally not native to the area and if they escape (which they do) they create disease among native fish, pollute the native species gene pool and compete for food and spawning sites. Some 50,000 salmon are farmed in […]

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Fermented Fish
This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage Two - onward
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Prep Time 25 Mins
Passive Time 3 Days
Servings
Litre jar
Ingredients
Prep Time 25 Mins
Passive Time 3 Days
Servings
Litre jar
Ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Skin the fish and remove the bones, cut into mouth size pieces.
  2. Put the pieces of the fish into the jar mixing with slightly crushed peppercorns, a few slices of white onion (optional), coriander seeds, bay leaves and dill seeds or dill herb.
  3. In a separate jug add ½ litre of water and dissolve 1 tablespoon of sea salt and 3-4 tablespoons of your homemade whey. Pour this brine into the jar with the fish until the fish is completely covered; if the fish is not covered just add more water.
  4. Close the jar tightly and leave to ferment for 3-5 days at a room temperature, then store in the fridge.
  5. This fish does not keep long, so consume in the next few days. Serve with avocado, lemons and onions.
Recipe Notes

Alternative Options

Another way to ferment fish: buy some fresh sardines (also works for herring and mackerel), de-scale the fish, cut the heads off and clean the belly out. Put into a suitable size glass jar or a stainless steel pan. Add 1-2 cups of whey, 1-2 tablespoons of salt (per 1 litre), a teaspoon of black pepper corns (freshly crushed), 10 bay leaves and ½ a teaspoon of coriander seeds (freshly crushed). Top up with water so the fish is completely covered with water, you may want to float a small plate on top of the fish to keep it submerged in the brine. Cover the pan or put the lid on the jar and let it ferment for 3-5 days at a room temperature. When the fish is ready take the meat off the bones, cut into bite-size pieces and serve with avocado, fresh dill and some chopped red onion.