Raw Milk Kefir

The GAPS ‘dairy introduction structure‘ promotes introducing whey first followed by yoghurt and then Kefir.  When introducing any of these, we do it methodically by first conducting the ‘food sensitivity test‘ first, followed by adding small amounts at a time added to other food to ensure they are well tolerated. This approach is used because […]

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Raw Milk Kefir
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Food Sensitivity Test

Introducing Dairy The GAPS ‘dairy introduction structure’ promotes introducing whey first followed by yoghurt and then Kefir. When introducing any of these, we do it methodically by first conducting the ‘food sensitivity test’ first, followed by adding small amounts at a time added to other food to ensure they are well tolerated. This approach is […]

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Food Sensitivity Test
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Dairy Introduction Structure

Introducing Dairy The GAPS ‘dairy introduction structure’ promotes introducing whey first followed by yoghurt and then Kefir. When introducing any of these, we do it methodically by first conducting the ‘food sensitivity test’ first, followed by adding small amounts at a time added to other food to ensure they are well tolerated. This approach is […]

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Dairy Introduction Structure
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Raw Dairy Milk Yoghurt – Creme Fraiche & Whey

This recipe is primarily a yoghurt recipe, however we will continue with a second set of instructions to produce some whey which should be introduced first on the introduction diet.  Using the same instructions here to make yoghurt, you can also make what Dr Natasha refers to as Creme Fraiche (sour Cream) This is in- […]

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Raw Dairy Yoghurt
This recipe is appropriate from stage one onward - HOWEVER, yoghurt should be introduced after whey has been introduced. Follow the steps on the introduction diet stage one
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Cook Time 24 - 30 Hours
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Equipment
  • 1 Yoghurt Maker I suggest the 'Wholesome me’ Yoghurt Maker as it is specifically designed for GAPS
  • 1 Milk thermometer If making yoghurt with pasturised milk
  • 1 Saucepan Only required for heating if you are not making raw yoghurt
  • 1 2 Litre Pyrex Jug For mixing the starter and pouring into jars
Yoghurt Culture Starter Options - SELECT ONE FROM BELOW
  • Cultured yoghurt starter powder (measure as per product instructions - add more for thicker result) GAPS Diet Australia have two options: Custom Probiotics Starter #2 (GAPS) and Gi Pro Starter (SCD)
  • 2-3 Synbiotic powder 3 scoops per one litre of milk (GutBiome Brand)
  • 1/3 Cup Homemade yoghurt as a starter per litre of milk
Cook Time 24 - 30 Hours
Servings
Ingredients
Ingredients
Equipment
  • 1 Yoghurt Maker I suggest the 'Wholesome me’ Yoghurt Maker as it is specifically designed for GAPS
  • 1 Milk thermometer If making yoghurt with pasturised milk
  • 1 Saucepan Only required for heating if you are not making raw yoghurt
  • 1 2 Litre Pyrex Jug For mixing the starter and pouring into jars
Yoghurt Culture Starter Options - SELECT ONE FROM BELOW
  • Cultured yoghurt starter powder (measure as per product instructions - add more for thicker result) GAPS Diet Australia have two options: Custom Probiotics Starter #2 (GAPS) and Gi Pro Starter (SCD)
  • 2-3 Synbiotic powder 3 scoops per one litre of milk (GutBiome Brand)
  • 1/3 Cup Homemade yoghurt as a starter per litre of milk
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Instructions
Yoghurt
  1. Steralise all your equipment such as the pyrex jug, whisk and yoghurt making jars/container.
  2. Pour your milk in a large jug. I like to use a two litre sized pyrex jug.
  3. Add your yoghurt culture starter option to the milk. Please refer to the yoghurt culture starter options listed above.  If you are using a powdered culture or synbiotic powder, be sure to first stir the powder into 15mls of milk in a separate sterilised cup first to ensure that the starter does not clump and then add this to the remaining milk and stir well. It is important to stir the starter well so that it blends and mixes with all the milk to produce a good yoghurt.  You can do this slowly and gradually with a whisk. (If you are not making raw yoghurt and you have heated the milk first, make sure that it cools down to a temperature between 38˚C and 45˚C before adding the culture).  
  4. After the starter culture has been added and mixed well to the milk, it is ready to pour into the yoghurt maker jars or glass dish. When this is done place them into the yoghurt maker.
  5. Set the timer for the desired incubation period and ferment the yoghurt for 24 hours (minimum) or more at a temperature range between 38˚C and 45˚C. 24 hour fermentation will allow the yoghurt to be virtually lactose and casein free and make proteins more digestible). The longer the ferment, the stronger and more tart the taste will become but the more beneficial it will be.
  6. When the fermentation is complete, transfer the yoghurt to the fridge to set for 6 hours before consuming.
  7. GAPS Yoghurt will produce a lovely creamy layer on top. This is easily mixed into the yoghurt or you can scoop it off and enjoy it as is.
Sweetening
  1. Fruit and honey are good natural sweetener options to add flavour. *Be sure not to add any fruit to the yoghurt before fermentation as this may allow mould or harmful bacteria to proliferate. 
Storage
  1. Keeps for several weeks in the fridge
Thickening Tips
  1. Raw yogurt will not naturally become as thick as traditional yogurt and may present with some whey. If you would like your yogurt to be thicker, try dripping it through a cheesecloth for a few hours to remove some of the whey (see below instructions).  Store the whey in the fridge and use for culturing or adding to dishes as per the introduction diet.
Dripping Your Whey
  1. With a large (bleach free) cheese cloth, line a stainless steel colander. Sometimes you will need to double or triple lay the cheese cloth for desired result. This means folding it over a couple of times to make it less pour’s which will slow down the dripping process and collect more cream cheese.
  2. Place the colander over a large glass bowl and pour your yoghurt into the cheesecloth lining the colander. This will allow the whey to drip through the cheese cloth and collect in the glass bowl underneath. Alternatively you can hang the cheesecloth from a kitchen cupboard handle and let it drip into a glass bowl underneath it.
  3. Cover the colander with a tea towel and leave it for a few hours. The result will establish a liquid in the glass bowl (whey) and remaining residue in the lined colander will resemble cottage cheese.
  4. Pour the whey into a clean glass jar with a tight lid to use with the GAPS introduction stages and keep it in the refrigerator. The whey can also be used as a starter for fermenting different foods, such as vegetables, fish, seeds and nuts (when your patient is ready to have them). Depending on how long you leave your yoghurt dripping, you can make cottage cheese or use these steps to make a thicker yoghurt. Both the yoghurt and the cheese can be used for baking, adding to salads and soups and as deserts with honey and fruit.
Recipe Notes

If you can not find raw milk

If you are unable to find raw milk, be sure to select organic full cream milk from grass fed cows and follow these steps at the beginning of the recipe.

1. Pour milk into a large saucepan and very slowly bring the pasturised milk close to boiling (approximately 80-90°C) in a stainless steel saucepan & stir occasionally. (Try not to boil too fast as it may burn) By bringing the milk close to boiling point (no higher than 80°C) you destroy any bacteria which may be lingering in the milk that can interfere with the fermentation process. It is important not to boil the milk as it will change its taste. (Boiling point is set at 100°C).

2.Take the saucepan off the stove and set aside to cool down.  You can cool it down faster by filling your sink with cold water and ice and submerging the base of the saucepan in the cold water. Keep an eye on the thermometer until it reaches between 38-45°C.

3. After the milk has cooled to 38-45°C, you may add your yoghurt starter. If you are using a powdered culture or synbiotic starter, be sure to first stir the powder into 15mls of milk in a separate sterilised cup to ensure that the starter does not clump and then add it to the remaining milk and stir well. It is important to stir the starter well so that it blends and mixes with the all the milk.  You can do this slowly and gradually with a whisk. IMPORTANT: Make sure you add the yoghurt or starter after it has cooled down between 38 – 45˚C and not any hotter or it will kill the beneficial bacteria.  When the culture is mixed well, pour the milk into a glass pyrex jug because the spout on the jug will make easier to pour into the yoghurt making jars.

Continue with the remaining cooking instructions from this recipe from step 4 onward.

IMPORTANT: Make sure you add the yoghurt or starter after it has cooled down between 38 – 45˚C and not any hotter or it will kill the beneficial bacteria.

If you can't use Dairy

If you have a true dairy allergy, you may make yoghurt with nut milk or coconut milk.  Please refer to our recipes on how to make these.

What yoghurt maker is best?

The Wholesome me yoghurt maker was specifically designed for GAPS

Turkey/Chicken Leg Casserole

This recipe is an extract from the GAPS Book as a staple for the Introduction Diet as well as the full GAPS Diet.  It is an easy delicious meal to prepare and is easily modified to cater for need or preference.  Please refer to the clinical notes for people undertaking the Introduction Diet Stages for […]

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Turkey/Chicken Leg Casserole
This recipe is appropriate for the Introduction Diet from Stage Two onward, however if sever digestive disturbances are experienced, please refer to the clinical notes below for modifications.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2.45 hours
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2.45 hours
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Instructions
  1. In a large oval casserole pot, add the stock, water, slat, tomato puree, cayenne pepper and herbs.
  2. Mix well and then add the turkey or chicken legs
  3. The tops of the turkey legs will be exposed from the other ingredients. Brush the legs with some duck fat and lightly salt the legs.
  4. Add Diced onion, celery and crushed garlic to a fry pan with a tablespoon of duck fat and saute until soft and then add to the casserole pot.
  5. Add the casserole pot to a preheated oven at 160 Degrees Celsius WITH LID OFF for 2 hours and 45 minutes.
  6. After the Casserole has been cooking for 2 hours, add the chopped vegetables. Mix them well into the sauce and leave cooking for a further 45 minutes.
  7. When the vegetables are cooked, remove the casserole from the oven. Serve the meat and vegetables on a dish and pour a few tablespoons of the sauce over the top.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Fibrous vegetables such as celery must be avoided for people with severed digestive disturbances such as diarrhoea.  Broccoli and Cauliflower stalks must be completely removed only using the heads and vegetables containing any seeds, or skins must be removed.

Introducing Raw Vegetables

Introducing Raw Vegetables in Stage 5 of the GAPS Introduction Diet Intervention instructions: Add raw vegetables starting from the following: 1. Softer parts of lettuce and cucumber 2. When the above two vegetables are well tolerated, start adding other raw vegetables such as carrot, tomato, onion, cabbage, capsicum, celery etc. Points • Refer to Clinic […]

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Introducing Raw Vegetables
This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet from stage Five onward
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Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

Monitor stools: If diarrhoea returns or becomes a new concern, your patient is not ready for this food and should remain on the step prior for longer.

Fried Egg

How do you like your eggs? The GAPS Introduction Diet introduces soft boiled eggs first in stage two followed by scrambled or fried in stage 3. Relatively simple this recipe can be adjusted to suit the individual in terms of sunny side up and sunny side down, however the important thing to remember is to […]

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Fried Egg
This recipe is appropriate for the Introduction Diet from stage 3 onward.
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Instructions
  1. Add the ghee to the fry pan and set on medium heat. Do not allow the ghee to burn
  2. I recommend cracking the egg into a small bowl first, and then pouring that gently into the pan. Make sure to pour slowly, letting the whites find their placement for 1 or 2 seconds before letting the yolk slip into the middle of the pan. Of course, you’re welcome to just crack and pour the egg directly into the pan.
  3. Cook the egg until the whites are cooked and the egg yolk is still runny. That is an official GAPS egg. We want the yolks to be runny to maximise the nutrition from the egg. You can flip the egg if you wish to have a sunny side down, however be careful not to over cook the yolk. Sunny side up will allow you to monitor the cooking of the yolk much better.

Scrambled Eggs

The GAPS Introduction Diet introduces scrambled eggs or fried eggs in stage three.  This is a simple and very quick recipe requiring very little preparation.  The ingredients contain only egg with a little ghee for cooking, however for more fluffier eggs, you can add a couple of tablespoons of sour cream or kefir. Print Recipe […]

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Scrambled Eggs
This recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introductions Diet from stage 3 onward
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Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 3 minutes
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Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 3 minutes
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Instructions
  1. Crack the eggs into a glass bowl
  2. Use a fork to beat eggs together.
  3. Melt ghee or duck fat in a fripan over low heat. Don't allow the ghee to burn.
  4. Add egg mixture and gently pull eggs to the center of the pan and let the liquid parts run out under the perimeter.
  5. Cook, continually moving eggs with the metal spatula, just until eggs are set. This will take approximately 1 to 3 minutes.
  6. Season with salt and pepper; serve hot with a little parsley.
Recipe Notes

Clinical Notes

When on the Full GAPS Diet, if digestion has improved you may introduce onion and celery to the mixture as well.

Guacamole

Serve ripe avocado daily with every bowl of soup and with meats and fish. Avocados are a great source of vitamins C, E, K, and B-6, as well as riboflavin, niacin, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, and potassium. They also provide lutein, beta-carotene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Although most of the calories in an avocado come […]

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Guacamole
This recipe is appropriate from stage three onward
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Instructions
  1. Slice the avocado down the middle and around the seed. Remove the seed and scoop the avocado out of it's skin and place into a small bowl.
  2. Crush the garlic with a garlic crusher and add it to the avocado. You may want to start with a small amount of garlic as raw garlic can have quite a bite, however one of the best foods for the immune system so I like to have at least 4 cloves.
  3. Add the lemon juice and crush all the ingredients together with the back of a fork or use a potato masher. When the texture is smooth to your liking, store in the fridge. The lemon juice will help preserve the colour for a while and it should last a couple of days in the fridge.

Cooking the perfect GAPS egg

Eggs are the easiest food to digest and their nourishment has been compared to breast milk because it can be absorbed almost 100 percent without needing digestion.  Egg yolks provide many amino acids, vitamins (B1, B2, B6, B12, A, D & biotin), essential fatty acids, magnesium and zinc among many others.  Eggs are particularly high […]

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Cooking the perfect GAPS Egg
Eggs are appropriate for the introduction diet from stage 2 onward and for the GAPS Baby Diet Protocol from stage 4 onward
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Prep Time 1 minutes
Cook Time 3-5 minutes
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  • 1 egg organic free range
Prep Time 1 minutes
Cook Time 3-5 minutes
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  • 1 egg organic free range
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Instructions
  1. Cook the egg so that the egg white is cooked and the egg yolk is still runny. This may require your own testing on the stove because every stove type will generate different heat and some are more immediate than others. Once you have achieved the desired egg, try to remember the time it took to cook it and you will have the perfect egg every time.
  2. For the perfect GAPS egg to ensure teh white is cooked and egg yolk runny, we recommend 3-5 minutes as shown on the egg cooking time chart.
  3. Peal the egg shell under cold water whilst it is still hot but not too hot to touch. This makes for an easier way to peal the egg with out breakage, otherwise put it in an egg cup, slice off the top and scoop it out.
  4. Add an egg to every bowl of soup.

Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is a condiment suggested to be eaten as a side dish whenever meat is consumed and especially at the end of the day when the body’s enzyme storage is depleted having already been expended on previous meals earlier in the day.  The evening meal is often the most difficult for people who suffer from […]

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Sauerkraut
This recipe is appropriate for the introduction diet from stage One onward
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Sauerkraut
Sauerkraut Equipment
  • 1 Fermentation Vessel A glass jar or crock with a weight to hold the vegetables submerged under the brine and an airlock system with a release valve to allow air to escape whilst creating an anaerobic environment. Refer to Weck images below
  • 1 Mandolin For slicing cabage (or use a knife)
Servings
Litre
Ingredients
Sauerkraut
Sauerkraut Equipment
  • 1 Fermentation Vessel A glass jar or crock with a weight to hold the vegetables submerged under the brine and an airlock system with a release valve to allow air to escape whilst creating an anaerobic environment. Refer to Weck images below
  • 1 Mandolin For slicing cabage (or use a knife)
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Instructions
  1. Thinly slice or shred the cabbage with a knife or mandolin. I like to use a mandolin.
  2. Place the shredded cabbage in a large glass bowl and add the dill (optional).
  3. For Wild Fermentation, add a generous amount of salt to the cabbage and mix it through with your hands to allow an overall coverage. Let it sit for 15 – 20 minutes to allow the salt to draw out some of the cabbage juice naturally. 5-8grams - (max 15grams) per 1kg cabbage. HINTS: Salt allows the cabbage to sweat so that juices can be extracted to create the brine. For Cultured fermentation, add the commercial culture starter as per packet instructions.
  4. Mix, massage and knead the ingredients with your hands. Bruising the cabbage this way allows the cabbage to extract a natural brine solution. Keep kneading until you have squeezed a substantial amount of juice from the mixture. Sometimes this may take 10-20 minutes. HINTS: It is beneficial to have someone with strong hands to do the kneading & massaging.
  5. Place mixture into the selected fermenting vessel and pack and push the mixture down so that the cabbage is compacted in the bottom and the juice is sitting on the top of the cabbage with a minimum of 4 - 5cm’s or 2 inches. It is important to push the cabbage down firmly so that no air is trapped and the cabbage is completely submerged in and under its own brine juice. HINTS: If for any reason the cabbage is not submerged under enough of its own juices, you may need to add a small amount of filtered water with more salt (15 gms of salt to 1 ltr).
  6. Place the weight on the top of the cabbage to keep all the cabbage submerged. Push the weight down and you will see more juice rise to the top. It is very important to ensure that all the sauerkraut is submerged under its own juice. If any bits of cabbage float up to the surface, remove them throughout the fermentation process to prevent them from going moldy.
  7. If you use a canning jar with a rubber ring top, and close the lid, be sure to burp it a few times in the first few days to release the pressure. If using the weck airlock system which has it's own release valve allowing gasses to escape without letting air into the jar, place the rubber ring around the top and clamp down the lid with the attached release valve to the top. Store in a dark place for one to two weeks (ie pantry).
  8. The sauerkraut may be consumed and ready to eat after 5-7 days but it matures better with age so it is good to wait the full two weeks unless the outside temperature is hot which will speed up the fermentation process.
  9. The sauerkraut may be stored in the fridge after 1-2 weeks of fermentation. If there is any scum or mold development on the top – remove this. The kraut remaining under the juice will be fine.
Recipe Notes

Optional: It is also nice to add a little grated carrot to your sauerkraut.

Liquorice Wheels

Adapted and inspired by the craft of Amy Sue, these delightful liquorice wheels taste like the real deal and send your kitchen into a frenzy with the adorable liquorice aroma that sets your patience to the test.  With another dehydrator recipe, you will be left with your mouth watering whilst these nutritious treats take time […]

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Liquorice Wheels
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Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 12 Hours
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Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 12 Hours
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Instructions
  1. Prepare 3-4 dehydrator trays with teflex sheets and put them aside.
  2. Remove the pits from your dates (this is easier when they are at room temperature).
  3. Grind your star anise with a mortar and pestle to a very fine powder (or use anise spice ready prepared).
  4. Add the dates to the food processor or thermomix and add the water and vanilla extract. Process the dates until they form a smooth paste. You may need to run a spoon down the sides a few times to ensure there is an even blend during the processing. When a smooth paste has formed, add the ground anise spice and briefly blend again to ensure it is all mixed evenly.
  5. Add the paste into a piping bag to create long smooth tube like lines. Keep the nozzle end close to the sheets to avoid creating wiggly lines. You may need a little practice first to see what I mean but don't worry if they are not perfect, they are still going to taste great and once they can be smoothed out slightly during the coiling process.
  6. Place the trays in the dehydrator at 115 degrees for approximately 12 hours or until they are ready for shaping but not completely done. Make sure you do not over do it. Some may need to dehydrate less than this and others may need to dehydrate a little longer.
  7. When the liquorice is pliable enough to shape into coils, gently roll them on the dehydrator sheet to un-stick them from the sheet. Start shaping your coils by starting from one end continue to curl them flat on the dehydrator sheet. (They are a little easier to do this if you take the sheet off the tray and lay the sheet flat on the bench).
  8. When the coils are tightly bound, place them onto the dehydrator mesh sheet (without the teflex sheet) to complete the drying process at the same temperature for another 8 hours. The time may differ at times requiring more or less time on different occasions. You know they are ready when they are dry and not sticky.
  9. Don't over dry them to the point that unwinding the coil causes the wheel to break.
  10. Individually wrap your liquorice wheels in baking paper and pin with a staple. If you want to get fancy, you can add your own label and put them in a special bag to give as a special gift made with love.
  11. Alternatively you can make the same recipe in one flat leather slab and cut them with scissors and roll them up. I call these Liquorice Leather Rolls. These take much less time and are easy to wrap and roll. 🙂

Fish Stock

Compared to the other stocks, fish stock is easier to make because there is no roasting or long cooking times required. The DHA and EPA make this stock more beneficial than other meat stock. These Omega-3 fatty acids are the most important nutrients for brain function. Fish stock will produce it’s own gelatin and other […]

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Fish Stock
*This fish stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2-4 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
3 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Fish Meat and Bone
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 2-4 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
3 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Fish Meat and Bone
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Instructions
  1. Place the fish bones, heads and fins into a large pot and fill it up with 3 litres of filtered water.
  2. Add the onion and garlic to the pot, along with the bay leaf, black pepper corns and salt.
  3. Add the fennel, parsley and juice from the lemon.
  4. Add the apple cider vinegar and bring to a boil. Skim off any scum that rises to the top. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for at least 2 - 4 hours.
  5. After cooking for the recommended time above, remove the bones and any meat by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve and discard all the vegetables and bones caught in the sieve.
  6. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones, fins, heads and vegetables added.
  7. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen for several months.
Recipe Notes

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key!  In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand.  I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up.   This can be added directly to the cook pot for use.  If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost.  Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them.  These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Fish Stock Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, fins and heads.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

https://shop.gapsaustralia.com.au/freezer-safe-mason-stock-storage-jar-475ml/