Pork Meat Stock

It is important to understand the difference between meat and bone broth. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Simply put, meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours or more. […]

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Pork Meat Stock
Remember, a rich meat stock is what we are seeking to make on the introduction stages, not bone broth until you graduate to the Full GAPS Diet Program. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Pork Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 3-4 items from this group below
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Pork Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 3-4 items from this group below
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Instructions
  1. Your selected meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it. Ask your butcher to cut some large tubular marrow bones so that the marrow can be easily accessed like that shown in the image.
  2. Lightly brown the meat cuts in lard or ghee in a frypan or . This creates added flavour to the stock. Do not cook it, just lightly sear it with a sprinkle of salt to create flavour.
  3. Place the bones and meat joints into a large pot and fill it up with 4 litres of filtered water.
  4. Cut the onions into halves or quarters and add them to the pot along with roughly chopped carrots and crushed garlic cloves. If you are following the introduction diet stages, we recommend you avoid the fibrous vegetables such as celery at this time.
  5. Add salt to taste at the beginning of cooking and about a teaspoon of black peppercorns.
  6. Add apple cider vinegar and fresh oregano.
  7. Bring to a boil and skim and skim off any scum that rises to the top. Then reduce the heat and leave on the stove at a low simmer for about 3–6 hours. If you are cooking in the oven, cook at 150°C for 3 hours. If using crock pot, cook on high for 2 hours, then on low for 6 -8 hours. This is the measured cooking time frame to make your nutrient meat stock. Bone stock without the meat cuts are usually longer. The longer you cook the bone stock the more nutrients and the softer the bones become for fishing out marrow.
  8. After cooking for the recommended time above, remove the meat, marrow and bones by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve. You can do this by collecting the stock under the strainer into a larger pot. Strip off all the meat and soft tissues from the bones as best as you can and extract the bone marrow out of the large tubular bones while they are still warm: to do that bang the bone on a thick wooden chopping board. The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and these should be put aside with the meat that has been stripped from the bones to add later to soups or as a meal. It is also ok for the patient to eat the marrow and soft tissue direct from the bones.
  9. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones and vegetables added. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen. The bones can be frozen and later used again to make bone broth.
Recipe Notes

If you wish to make bone broth/stock later, you can keep the bones by storing them in the freezer and cook the ingredients for longer to extract more nutrients from the bones.  Refer to our Bone Broth Recipe to make this but remember not to introduce bone broth until you are on Full GAPS Diet or simply continue with the nutritious meat and gelatin stocks.

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key! In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand. I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up. This can be added directly to the cook pot for use. If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost. Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them. These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Butcher supplies for meat stock

The ratio of ingredients is individual and dependant on the size of the batch you wish to make but keep in mind that some stock should be reserved for drinking and some for making your batch for soup.  The remainder of your ingredients will depend on what type of meat stock you are making.  Here is a list of bone selections you can ask for at your organic butcher shop.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Game Selections

  • Large tubular marrow bones
  • Gelatinous meats
  • Meaty rib bones
  • Osso Buco cuts
  • Knuckle bones
  • Shanks
  • Neck bones
  • Tail bones
  • Trotters
  • Joints
  • Ears

Poultry Selections

  • Whole chicken & extra chicken frames
  • Feet from one chicken
  • Gizards & giblets
  • Spatchcock
  • Pheasants
  • Pigeon
  • Goose
  • Duck

Fish Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, hoofs, trotters and soft animal tissues from gelatinous meats.
  • The celery sticks should be avoided for patients in the introductions diet stages.  These can be added later on full gaps for added stock flavour.  They can be freshly cut as shown in the instructions or sauteed in a pan with onion and garlic prior to adding to the pot  for added flavour.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Charting the highest source of essential nutrients

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

 

GAPS Basic Healing Soup

This soup recipe can be adapted to make any meat, poultry or fish and vegetable combination soup made from previously prepared meat stocks.  For the purpose of this recipe, we will be cooking the chicken and vegetable soup.  Usually when I make my chicken stock, I will save some for the freezer in mason jars […]

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GAPS Basic Healing Soup
*This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward
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Prep Time 50 Minutes
Cook Time 3 Hours
Servings
Litre batch
Ingredients
Vegetables
Meat & Stock
  • 1 Litre Chicken Meat Stock Select from the meat stock preference you made earlier
  • 1 Whole Chicken This was used to make the meat stock recipe and put aside to make this recipe. Alternatively just add a new chicken.
Prep Time 50 Minutes
Cook Time 3 Hours
Servings
Litre batch
Ingredients
Vegetables
Meat & Stock
  • 1 Litre Chicken Meat Stock Select from the meat stock preference you made earlier
  • 1 Whole Chicken This was used to make the meat stock recipe and put aside to make this recipe. Alternatively just add a new chicken.
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Instructions
  1. Bring some of the meat stock to boil, add chopped or sliced vegetables: onions, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, courgettes, marrow, squash, pumpkin, spinach etc. and simmer for 25-35 minutes. When on the introduction diet, you can choose any combination of available vegetables avoiding very fibrous ones, such as all varieties of cabbage and celery. All particularly fibrous parts of vegetables need to be removed, such as skin and seeds on pumpkins, zucchini and squash, remove stalk from broccoli and cauliflower and any other parts that look too fibrous.
  2. If you made your own chicken stock and saved the chicken meat for other recipes, dice the meat that you set aside and place them in the pot with the vegetables. (if you did not save the meat from your stock recipe - cook a new fresh chicken according to the recommendations shown in the stock recipe first and then pull all the meat and skin from the chicken and dice it into small pieces and add to the vegetables). Otherwise continue to cook the vegetables and meats until the vegetables are soft. Approximately 1 hour on simmer.
  3. When vegetables are well cooked, add the crushed garlic, bring to boil and turn the heat off. We want the garlic to be added at the end to be only slightly cooked to receive maximum immune benefits from it.
  4. If you are cooking for children who are fussy eaters or for babies starting out on solids, you can blend the soup which will make it easier. This recipe will generally keep in the fridge for 5 days but can also be frozen.
Recipe Notes

Serving for GAPS

Serve the soup with a drizzle of cold pressed extra virgin olive oil on top (1-2 tbl sp).  Add sauerkraut or juice or eat  1 – 2 table spoons sauerkraut at the beginning of the meal.

Never add sauerkraut, its juice or olive oil directly to any hot food as this will kill the enzymes and minor component nutrients.  Always wait for the food to cool before adding them.  The general rule is:  if you can put your finger in it, then it’s ready.  Refer to the introduction diet for the progressive introduction of sauerkraut and olive oil.

The ratio of stock, meat and vegetables is individual and dependant upon the size of the batch you wish to make.

Clinical Notes:

The introduction diet is primarily designed for people suffering with diarrhoea and that is why the chosen vegetables are low in fibre.  If you have chosen to follow the introduction diet because of leaky gut and food allergies but are more susceptible to constipation, it is important to add more fibrous vegetables like cabbage and celery.  Don’t avoid cutting of stems from broccoli etc and leave the skins and seeds on vegetables like zucchini.  You may even decide to serve up some well cooked beetroot with your soup.

Hints

  • Cut vegetables and meat into small neat sized pieces unless you plan to blend or puree it.

Other suggested and allowable ingredients

  • Fresh or dried Italian or French mushrooms can be added to pork, lamb or beef soup to enhance the flavour. Dried mushrooms can be crushed by had before adding to the soup
  • Chopped parsley, coriander, oregano or dill
  • A spoonful of yoghurt or sour cream (creme fraiche)
  • Red onion
  • Spring onion
  • Cooked ground liver
  • Boiled eggs (yolk still runny)
  • Raw or cooked beetroots
  • Other herbs and spices (only when digestion has started to show improvements)

 

Duck Dripping

Duck fat is an old time cooking staple in Southwest France and a secret ingredient of chefs use worldwide. Incredibly tasty with a silky mouth-feel, duck fat enhances anything it is used to cook with. The great thing about rendering your own duck fat is that you end up with a batch of cracklings—delicious to […]

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Duck Dripping
Rendered Animal Fats: Stage one appropriate onward
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Prep Time 15-20 Minutes
Cook Time 1-2 Hours
Servings
Cup
Ingredients
Prep Time 15-20 Minutes
Cook Time 1-2 Hours
Servings
Cup
Ingredients
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Instructions
Option one Dripping
  1. From one whole organic duck, remove the fat and skin and set aside. The duck meat and bones can be frozen and used in a later recipe. Alternatively you can ask your butcher for duck or chicken skins.
  2. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius and bake your duck fat on top of the dripping rack with the oven pan placed beneath to catch all the fat dripping.
  3. When all the fat is cooked in approximately two hours, remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the dripping into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Option 2 Rendering
  1. From one whole organic duck, remove the fat and skin and set aside. The duck meat and bones can be frozen and used in a later recipe. Alternatively you can ask your butcher for duck or chicken skins.
  2. Cut skin and fat into medium pieces and put into a medium heavy-bottomed pot. Add ½ cup water and simmer over medium heat until water evaporates and skin pieces are crisp and have released all their fat, about 1 hour.
  3. Remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the dripping into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Recipe Notes

Storage: Store in Ball mason wide mouthed freezer safe jars.  These are heat tempered and will not crack when you pour the lard into them.

This fat can also be made using chicken skins: just ask your butcher for a bag of chicken skins.  This can also be rendered on a low heat in a slow cooker whilst also producing tasty crunchy chicken skins for snacks.  Kids love em.

Lard & Tallow

Rendering animal fats are very simple – in this recipe we will provide three ways to render lard and tallow/suet ►Lard from Pork FAT ►Tallow & Suet from Beef or Lamb FAT Ask your butcher for a big bag of any of the above animal fats (preferably organic) ► Dripping from a Duck, or Goose […]

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Lard & Tallow
Rendered Animal Fats: Stage one appropriate onward
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Prep Time 15-20 Minutes
Cook Time 2-4 Hours
Servings
Mills
Ingredients
Option 1: Dripping in the oven - You will need a large oven tray with a dripping rack
  • 1 Kg Raw Pork Fat Alternatives: Tallow (beef or lamb fat) cut off any excess meats
Option 2: Rendering in the oven - You will need a large oven tray
Option 3: Slow Cook Render - You will need a slow cooker
  • 1 kg Raw Pork Fat Alternatives: Tallow (beef or lamb fat) cut off any excess meats
Prep Time 15-20 Minutes
Cook Time 2-4 Hours
Servings
Mills
Ingredients
Option 1: Dripping in the oven - You will need a large oven tray with a dripping rack
  • 1 Kg Raw Pork Fat Alternatives: Tallow (beef or lamb fat) cut off any excess meats
Option 2: Rendering in the oven - You will need a large oven tray
Option 3: Slow Cook Render - You will need a slow cooker
  • 1 kg Raw Pork Fat Alternatives: Tallow (beef or lamb fat) cut off any excess meats
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Instructions
Option One: Oven Dripping
  1. Preheat the oven to 120 - 130 degrees Celsius.
  2. Trim off any meat still attached to the fat - we only want the fat. A little bit of meat left on the fat is harmless as it will drop out during the rendering process, however it will change the flavour.
  3. Place the fat pieces on your dripping rack and sit your dripping rack on or inside your oven pan.
  4. Render the fat for approximately 2-3 hours. The liquid fat will drip from the large piece of fat into the bottom pan.
  5. Remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the lard into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Option Two: Oven Render
  1. Preheat the oven to 120 degrees Celsius.
  2. Trim off any meat still attached to the fat - we only want the fat. A little bit of meat left on the fat is harmless as it will drop out during the rendering process, however it will change the flavour.
  3. Cut your lard or tallow into small pieces (approximately 1 inch cubes) and place into your oven dish.
  4. Pour the water into the oven dish, this will reduce the lard or tallow from burning on the edges and the water will evaporate during the process.
  5. Place the oven dish inside and cover with a lid.
  6. Render for approximately 2 – 2 ½ hours whilst attending to it by stirring occasionally with a steel spoon. The fat cubes will gradually release its fat in liquid form whilst becoming crisp and shriveled. If you notice that the water has not yet evaporated, you can increase the temperature to 165 degrees Celsius and keep it uncovered for ten minutes.
  7. Remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the lard into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Option 3: Slow Cooker
  1. Trim off any meat still attached to the fat - we only want the fat. A little bit of meat left on the fat is harmless as it will drop out during the rendering process, however it will change the flavour.
  2. Chop your fat into tiny small pieces. Alternatively you can mince the fat in a food processor or thermomix, however it is important to note that your fat will need to be frozen before you mince it or it will result in a slimy mess and clog the blades.
  3. Place the fat into your slow cooker. Turn it onto the lowest temperature and cook for 3 - 4 hours.
  4. Cooking times will vary depending on temperature, volume and size of the fat pieces but a general rule is to cook until you have small browned cracklings in a bath of clear fat.
  5. Remove from the heat and allow to cool a little before filtering through a stainless steel strainer. Discard the fat and pour the lard into heat tempered glass jars like the ball mason wide mouthed jars - see link for supplies below. Be careful not to pour into regular glass jars to avoid the risk of breakage.
Recipe Notes

Storage: Store in Ball mason wide mouthed freezer safe jars.  These are heat tempered and will not crack when you pour the lard into them.

Chicken Meat Stock

It is important to understand the difference between meat and bone broth. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Simply put, meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours or more. […]

Print Recipe
Chicken Meat Stock
Remember, a rich meat stock is what we are seeking to make on the introduction stages, not bone broth until you graduate to the Full GAPS Diet Program. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward. Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 1.5 -3 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic ingredients
Chicken or other Poultry Stock
Prep Time 40 Minutes
Cook Time 1.5 -3 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic ingredients
Chicken or other Poultry Stock
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Instructions
  1. Place chicken frames, feet, gizzards and whole chicken into a large pot and fill it up with 4 Litres of filtered water, add natural unprocessed salt to your taste at the beginning of cooking and about a teaspoon of black peppercorns, roughly crushed (optional – pepper sometimes too hot for children). Apple cider vinegar can be added at this point if you are using it.
  2. Add fresh oregano and peppercorns.
  3. Bring to boil on the stove and skim and discard any floating scum on the top. Cover and simmer on a low heat for 1 ½ -3 hours. If you are using a crock pot, cook for 1 hour on high, then 6 hours on low.
  4. After cooking for the recommended time, remove the meat and bones by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve. You can do this by collecting the stock under the strainer into a larger pot or large pyrex jug. Strip off all the meat and soft tissues from the bones as best as you can and put aside. The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and these should be put aside with the meat that has been stripped from the bones to add later to the soup. It is also good for the patient to eat the marrow and soft tissue direct from the bones as a meal.
  5. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones and vegetables added. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen.
Recipe Notes

If you wish to make bone broth/stock later, you can keep the bones by storing them in the freezer and cook the ingredients for longer to extract more nutrients from the bones.  Refer to our Bone Broth Recipe to make this but remember not to introduce bone broth until you are on Full GAPS Diet or simply continue with the nutritious meat and gelatin stocks.

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key! In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand. I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up. This can be added directly to the cook pot for use. If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost. Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them. These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Butcher supplies for meat stock

The ratio of ingredients is individual and dependant on the size of the batch you wish to make but keep in mind that some stock should be reserved for drinking and some for making your batch for soup.  The remainder of your ingredients will depend on what type of meat stock you are making.  Here is a list of bone selections you can ask for at your organic butcher shop.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Game Selections

  • Large tubular marrow bones
  • Gelatinous meats
  • Meaty rib bones
  • Osso Buco cuts
  • Knuckle bones
  • Shanks
  • Neck bones
  • Tail bones
  • Trotters
  • Joints
  • Ears

Poultry Selections

  • Whole chicken & extra chicken frames
  • Feet from one chicken
  • Gizards & giblets
  • Spatchcock
  • Pheasants
  • Pigeon
  • Goose
  • Duck

Fish Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, hoofs, trotters and soft animal tissues from gelatinous meats.
  • The celery sticks should be avoided for patients in the introductions diet stages.  These can be added later on full gaps for added stock flavour.  They can be freshly cut as shown in the instructions or sauteed in a pan with onion and garlic prior to adding to the pot  for added flavour.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Charting the highest source of essential nutrients

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

 

Lamb Meat Stock

It is important to understand the difference between meat and bone broth. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Simply put, meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours or more. […]

Print Recipe
Lamb Meat Stock
Remember, a rich meat stock is what we are seeking to make on the introduction stages, not bone broth until you graduate to the Full GAPS Diet Program. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward. Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Lamb Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 3-4 items from this group below
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Lamb Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 3-4 items from this group below
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Instructions
  1. Your selected meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it. Ask your butcher to cut some large tubular marrow bones so that the marrow can be easily accessed like that shown in the image.
  2. Lightly brown the meat cuts in tallow or ghee in a frypan or . This creates added flavour to the stock. Do not cook it, just lightly sear it with a sprinkle of salt to create flavour.
  3. Place the bones and meat joints into a large pot and fill it up with 4 litres of filtered water.
  4. Cut the onions into halves or quarters and add them to the pot along with roughly chopped carrots and crushed garlic cloves. If you are following the introduction diet stages, we recommend you avoid the fibrous vegetables such as celery at this time.
  5. Add salt to taste at the beginning of cooking and about a teaspoon of black peppercorns.
  6. Add apple cider vinegar and fresh oregano.
  7. Bring to a boil and skim off any scum that rises to the top. Then reduce the heat and leave on the stove at a low simmer for about 3–6 hours. If you are cooking in the oven, cook at 150°C for 3 hours. If using crock pot, cook on high for 2 hours, then on low for 6 hours. This is the measured cooking time frame to make your nutrient meat stock. Bone stock without the meat cuts are usually longer. The longer you cook the bone stock the more nutrients and the softer the bones become for fishing out marrow.
  8. After cooking for the recommended time above, remove the meat, marrow and bones by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve. You can do this by collecting the stock under the strainer into a larger pot. Strip off all the meat and soft tissues from the bones as best as you can and extract the bone marrow out of the large tubular bones while they are still warm: to do that bang the bone on a thick wooden chopping board. The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and these should be put aside with the meat that has been stripped from the bones to add later to soups or as a meal. It is also ok for the patient to eat the marrow and soft tissue direct from the bones.
  9. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones and vegetables added. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen. The bones can be frozen and later used again to make bone broth.
Recipe Notes

If you wish to make bone broth/stock later, you can keep the bones by storing them in the freezer and cook the ingredients for longer to extract more nutrients from the bones.  Refer to our Bone Broth Recipe to make this but remember not to introduce bone broth until you are on Full GAPS Diet or simply continue with the nutritious meat and gelatin stocks.

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key! In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand. I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up. This can be added directly to the cook pot for use. If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost. Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them. These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Butcher supplies for meat stock

The ratio of ingredients is individual and dependant on the size of the batch you wish to make but keep in mind that some stock should be reserved for drinking and some for making your batch for soup.  The remainder of your ingredients will depend on what type of meat stock you are making.  Here is a list of bone selections you can ask for at your organic butcher shop.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Game Selections

  • Large tubular marrow bones
  • Gelatinous meats
  • Meaty rib bones
  • Osso Buco cuts
  • Knuckle bones
  • Shanks
  • Neck bones
  • Tail bones
  • Trotters
  • Joints
  • Ears

Poultry Selections

  • Whole chicken & extra chicken frames
  • Feet from one chicken
  • Gizards & giblets
  • Spatchcock
  • Pheasants
  • Pigeon
  • Goose
  • Duck

Fish Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, hoofs, trotters and soft animal tissues from gelatinous meats.
  • The celery sticks should be avoided for patients in the introductions diet stages.  These can be added later on full gaps for added stock flavour.  They can be freshly cut as shown in the instructions or sauteed in a pan with onion and garlic prior to adding to the pot  for added flavour.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Charting the highest source of essential nutrients

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

 

Beef Meat Stock

It is important to understand the difference between meat and bone broth. Meat stock and bone broth are two different things. Simply put, meat stock is made over a few hours with raw bones and meat, where as bone broth is made with old cooked bones and cooked over 12 – 24 hours or more. […]

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Beef Meat Stock
Remember, a rich meat stock is what we are seeking to make on the introduction stages, not bone broth until you graduate to the Full GAPS Diet Program. *This meat stock recipe is appropriate for the GAPS Introduction Diet Stage One - onward. Things you may need: Wide Mouthed Mason Stock Storage Jars, 6-8L Stainless Steel Cooking Pot, Stainless Steel colander, straining spoon and Cheesecloth.
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Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Beef Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 4-5 items from this group below
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 3-6 Hours
Passive Time 30 Minutes
Servings
4 litre pot
Ingredients
Basic Ingredients
Beef Meat Joints: Your meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it - Select at least 4-5 items from this group below
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Instructions
  1. Your selected meat joint must contain bones with marrow, soft tissue and bones with meat still attached to it. Osso Bucco cuts as shown in the image are perfect for this, along with the other meaty bones and joints listed in the recipe. Lightly brown the meat cuts in tallow or ghee in a frypan or . This creates added flavour to the stock. Do not cook it, just lightly sear it with a sprinkle of salt to create flavour.
  2. Place the bones and meat joints into a large pot and fill it up with 4 litres of filtered water.
  3. Cut the onions into halves or quarters and add them to the pot along with roughly chopped carrots and crushed garlic cloves. If you are following the introduction diet stages, we recommend you avoid the fibrous vegetables such as celery at this time.
  4. Add salt to taste at the beginning of cooking and about a teaspoon of black peppercorns.
  5. Add apple cider vinegar and fresh oregano.
  6. Bring to a boil and skim off any scum that rises to the top. Then reduce the heat and leave on the stove at a low simmer for about 3–6 hours. If you are cooking in the oven, cook at 150°C for 3 hours. If using crock pot, cook on high for 2 hours, then on low for 8–10 hours. This is the measured cooking time frame to make your nutrient meat stock. Bone stock without the meat cuts are usually longer. The longer you cook the bone stock the more nutrients and the softer the bones become for fishing out marrow.
  7. After cooking for the recommended time above, remove the meat, marrow and bones by straining the stock ingredients through a sieve. You can do this by collecting the stock under the strainer into a larger pot. Strip off all the meat and soft tissues from the bones as best as you can and extract the bone marrow out of the large tubular bones while they are still warm: to do that bang the bone on a thick wooden chopping board. The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and these should be put aside with the meat that has been stripped from the bones to add later to soups or as a meal. It is also ok for the patient to eat the marrow and soft tissue direct from the bones.
  8. Strain the remaining stock with a cheesecloth to remove all remaining small bones, pepper corns and any vegetables that were added. Discard any tiny bones and vegetables added. Store the stock in wide mouthed freezer safe mason jars in the fridge or freezer. The meat stock will keep well in the fridge for at least 7 days or it can be frozen. The bones can be frozen and later used again to make bone broth.
Recipe Notes

If you wish to make bone broth/stock later, you can keep the bones by storing them in the freezer and cook the ingredients for longer to extract more nutrients from the bones.  Refer to our Bone Broth Recipe to make this but remember not to introduce bone broth until you are on Full GAPS Diet or simply continue with the nutritious meat and gelatin stocks.

For Best Storage

Storing your stock properly will be key! In the fridge it lasts up to 7 days so it is best to purchase freezer safe storage containers to keep you stock on hand. I recommend purchasing a dozen or more Wide Mouthed Freezer Safe Mason Jars. These will allow you to have stock on hand within minutes because the wide opening allows the stock to slide straight out after running the bottom of the jar under hot tap water for a few minutes to loosen it up. This can be added directly to the cook pot for use. If you freeze in other glass jars, the stock will not slide out and you will have to wait for it to defrost. Other glass jars are not freezer safe and you can easily destroy an entire batch with glass cracking in the freezer or from the change in temperature when running them under hot water to loosen them. These jars are supplied at our Online GAPS Shop

Butcher supplies for meat stock

The ratio of ingredients is individual and dependant on the size of the batch you wish to make but keep in mind that some stock should be reserved for drinking and some for making your batch for soup.  The remainder of your ingredients will depend on what type of meat stock you are making.  Here is a list of bone selections you can ask for at your organic butcher shop.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Game Selections

  • Large tubular marrow bones
  • Gelatinous meats
  • Meaty rib bones
  • Osso Buco cuts
  • Knuckle bones
  • Shanks
  • Neck bones
  • Tail bones
  • Trotters
  • Joints
  • Ears

Poultry Selections

  • Whole chicken & extra chicken frames
  • Feet from one chicken
  • Gizards & giblets
  • Spatchcock
  • Pheasants
  • Pigeon
  • Goose
  • Duck

Fish Selections

  • Fish frames with heads (no fish meat)
  • Skins
  • Fins

Hints & Facts:

  • Add 1/4 a cup of apple cider vinegar to help draw out minerals from the bones and into the stock such as calcium potassium and magnesium. Some people may not be ready to add this during intro.
  • Choose fatty fish like mackerel or salmon. But make sure they are not farmed or preserved in any way.
  • Gelatine as the substance extracted by boiling bones, hoofs, trotters and soft animal tissues from gelatinous meats.
  • The celery sticks should be avoided for patients in the introductions diet stages.  These can be added later on full gaps for added stock flavour.  They can be freshly cut as shown in the instructions or sauteed in a pan with onion and garlic prior to adding to the pot  for added flavour.

Contrary to popular belief meat, fish and organ meats like liver and kidney have the highest contents of vitamins, amino acids nourishing fats, many minerals and other nutrients which we need in order to be adequately nourished.

Charting the highest source of essential nutrients

Clinical Notes:

Low fibre is the aim initially (especially for people who have profuse watery diarhoea), however if you are more prone to constipation, you can add onion, celery and cabbage to the stock for more flavour.

 

Cookies & Caramel Cream

Caramel Cream Barrels of pure joy.  Love at first Bite!!!  This little treat creates a burst of flavour to enjoy with the sound of a crack with the first bite followed by pure enjoyment.  Ok, I am in love with this little creation and hope you are too.  Enjoy.     Print Recipe Cookies & […]

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Cookies & Caramel Cream
This recipe is appropriate for people who are following the Full GAPS Diet.
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Prep Time 1 Hour
Passive Time 4 - 6 Hours
Servings
Cups
Ingredients
Caramel Cream Filling
Nut Sprinkles
Prep Time 1 Hour
Passive Time 4 - 6 Hours
Servings
Cups
Ingredients
Caramel Cream Filling
Nut Sprinkles
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Instructions
Biscuit Bottom
  1. Pre-heat oven to 150 degrees Celsius for 10 minutes (no hotter)
  2. Mix all ingredients in a bowl with a spoon, followed by massaging all the contents and squeezing the ingredients in your hands where you can feel the mixture starting to stick together and form shape. Depending on the consistency of the mixture, add more nut butter or coconut oil if it is too dry or more nut flour if it is too moist. You want to create a cookie dough so keep mixing and squeezing the contents with your hands so that the mixture can form a big ball ready for making smaller balls.
  3. When you have rolled the cookie mixture into a ball on the bench top, pinch a section of the dough and roll the section into a ball approximately 4cm in width. Continue this until you have 24 balls ready.
  4. Place each ball into mini round cardboard baking cups. These will be used as the mold for the entire cheesecake and they should be 5cm wide measured from the bottom.
  5. Press the first layer with your thumb by pushing the ball down flat to make a base in the bottom of the cup ensureing it reaches all the sides with good coverage.
  6. Place the baking cups onto a baking tray and place the tray in the preheated oven at no more than 150 degrees Celsius for 10 minutes, keeping a close eye on them to ensure they do not burn. Almond flour burns easily so do not cook any higher than 150 degrees Celsius.
  7. Remove the tray from the oven after 10 minutes and let the cookies cool for 5 minutes and then place them in the fridge for 15 minutes to cool whilst you prepare the next layer.
Caramel Cream Filling
  1. After soaking the Midjool dates for 20 minutes, add them to the thermomix or food processor with the remaining caramel Cream filling ingredients except for the gelatin powder and water.
  2. Mix on a medium to high speed to combine all the ingredients to make a smooth sauce like consistency whilst occasionally stopping to wipe down the sides with the spatula to ensure all the ingredients are blended together evenly.
  3. Place the gelatin powder in a small bowl or cup and add the warm water stiring well to make a consistency similar to apple sauce. Add this to the mixture in the thermomix and blend well.
  4. Remove the baking cups from the fridge and add a spoonful of the mixture until all the ingredients is evenly dispersed in each cup.
  5. With the back of a teaspoon, level out the cream centre so that it is reasonably flat and place the cups in the freezer for 15-20 minutes.
Nut Sprinkles
  1. Place the nuts in the thermomix or blender to chop into the size you prefer to add as a nut sprinkle layer. I like to make ours a little bit chunky. You can also chop them if you wrap them inside a tea towel and bang them with a wooden rolling pin.
  2. Sprinkle the nut mix evenly over the top of the coconut cream filling until distributed evenly in all 24 cups.
Chocolate Top
  1. Simmer some water on a low heat in a saucepan and place a glass bowl over the simmering water. I like to use a pyrex jug (size measures 4 cups) for this as it works nicely to pour the ingredients later.
  2. Add the cacao butter to the glass bowl and melt the cacao butter completely. (CAUTION: Keep the heat at a low temperature so that the steam does not cause any water residue within the glass bowl and make sure all your utensils and materials do not have any water on them because any water contaminating the mixture will cause lumps and clumps and spoil the smooth chocolate result).
  3. Once melted, turn off the heat and add the cocao powder gradually whilst stirring continuously with a bone dry whisk until mixed well with no lumps. Add honey and vanilla essence and continue to whisk. Let the chocoloate topping cool for 5 minutes.
  4. Pour chocolate mixture over the top and remember to allow some of the nuts to be exposed at the tops. This gives it character and encourages you not to over fill the top layer. Aim not to make the top layer too thick or it will make it difficult to bite into.
  5. Refrigerate for 4 - 6 hour to fully set.
  6. When all ingredients have set, you can tear the cardboard paper cups and slowly remove the cheesecake medallions from the cup casing to expose them for serving. I recommend you keep them in the baking cups until you are ready to serve or eat.

Coconut Vanilla Fudge

This recipe will show you how to make your own sensational additive free chocolate. CONTAINS NO nuts, dairy, sugar, eggs or other additives.With a soft fudge coconut cream and vanilla flavoured centre, slightly coated in homemade dairy free chocolate, these old family favourites will be consumed quickly in our home. You can make them rough […]

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Coconut Vanilla Fudge
This recipe is appropriate for people who are following the full GAPS Diet and who do not have serious digestive issues.
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Prep Time 35 Minutes
Passive Time 45 Minutes
Servings
Slices
Ingredients
Coconut Cream Filling
Prep Time 35 Minutes
Passive Time 45 Minutes
Servings
Slices
Ingredients
Coconut Cream Filling
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Instructions
Cococnut Cream Filling
  1. Mix all coconut meat ingredients in a saucepan on medium heat until all ingredients is well combined and melted and then mix in a food processor to grind the dessicated coconut a little finer.
  2. Line a 8×6 inch dish with bleach free baking paper and pour the ingredients into the dish and push down flat.
  3. Place the coconut meat mixture dish into the freezer and leave for 4 hours or overnight.
  4. When the mixture has set hard, pull the sides of the baking paper up to pull out the coconut mixture out of the dish and place it on a chopping board. With a long sharp knife, carefully cut the coconut fudge middle meat into even squares.
  5. Place the squares into a container with a lid back into the freezer for preparation for the chocolate coating step.
Choc Coating
  1. Simmer some water on a low heat in a saucepan and place a glass bowl over the simmering water. Add the cacao butter to the glass bowl and melt the cacao butter completely. (CAUTION: Keep the heat at a low temperature so that the steam does not cause any water residue within the glass bowl and make sure all your utensils and materials do not have any water on them because any water contaminating the mixture will cause lumps and clumps and spoil the smooth chocolate result).
  2. Once melted, turn off the heat and add the cocao powder gradually whilst stirring continuously with a bone dry whisk until mixed well with no lumps. Add honey and vanilla essence and continue to whisk.
  3. When the mixture is lovely and smooth it is ready for the coconut meat fudge dipping.
Coating with chocolate
  1. Take the chopped coconut meat squares from the freezer and place one square on top of a fork.
  2. Dip the square into the chocolate so that it covers only half of the slice. (you can cover the entire slice if you want to and this can be done by dropping it into the choc mixture and then lifting it with the fork from the bottom and let the excess chocolate drip off.
  3. The cold coconut squares will start to harden the outer layer of chocolate as you lay the squares down onto some bleach free baking paper on a tray to set.
  4. Place the choc covered squares into the fridge for 10 minutes to set. These are reasonably stable at room temperature.
Recipe Notes

OPTIONAL: You may wish to add a teaspoon of organic mint flavour to the mixture if desired.

Easter Bunny Bites 

This recipe is easy to make with little preparation time required.   Print Recipe Easter Bunny Bites  This recipe is appropriate for people who are following the Introduction Diet from Stage 3 onwards. Cook Time10 minsTotal Time10 mins Course: Baking at home, Egg free recipesCuisine: Full GAPS Diet Recipes, GAPS Introduction Stages Ingredients2 Cups Organic […]

Crunchy Nut Seed Fruit Combo Bites or Bars

This recipe is a favourite and can resemble a crunchy nut and seed fruit bar or equivalent bite sized snack. When I make the bars, I tend to spread the ingredients into a thickness similar to a museli bar but when I like to make smaller bite sized pieces, I spread the ingredients further to […]

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Crunchy Nut Seed Fruit Combo Bites or Bars
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Instructions
  1. You may wish to lightly grind some of the nuts to break them up a little but they can be left as they are
  2. Soak all seeds and nuts overnight and rinse them under filtered water in a sieve
  3. Combine and mix all ingredients with your hands or a big spoon in a bowl
  4. The flax seed may need a little more draining in a sieve before you add them to the remaining of the ingredients. These will work as a binding agent to keep all your ingredients together.
  5. When all is combined simply spread the ingredients on a dehydrator sheet (1 cm thick) and Dry at 135 degrees F or 57 ◦C for 20-24 hrs
  6. You may dehydrate for longer if you want a crispier result or intend to make thicker nut/seed bars
  7. When completed, simply break into bite size snacks or cut specific portions with a knife. You may also wish to break it up further to make a muesli mix for breakfast with your yoghurt.
  8. You can explore any nut fruit and seed combo that you desire. Enjoy!

Chicken Vegetable Pie

You will need 4 mini pie pots (size 4cm width opening from the top) This is a delicious meal on it’s own, served with a salad and fermented vegetables on the side.  It is a great winter warmer for all the family. Print Recipe Chicken Vegetable Pie Votes: 0 Rating: 0 You: Rate this recipe! […]

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Chicken Vegetable Pie
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Course Main Dishes
Cuisine Full GAPS Diet
Prep Time 20 Mins
Cook Time 40 Mins
Passive Time 45 Mins
Servings
Pies
Ingredients
Pie Filling
Course Main Dishes
Cuisine Full GAPS Diet
Prep Time 20 Mins
Cook Time 40 Mins
Passive Time 45 Mins
Servings
Pies
Ingredients
Pie Filling
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Instructions
Pie Pasty Prep
  1. Preheat the oven to 150 Degrees Celsius
  2. Place all pie pastry ingredients into a bowl and kneed with your hands, massaging and squeezing the ingredients until it forms a tight ball. You can also get this effect very quickly if you place all ingredients in a thermomix for 20 seconds on speed 4.
  3. Roll the dough flat so that it is approximately 1cm thick. Cut out sections of the dough to fill 4 mini pie pots (size 4cm width opening from the top) and press them into the bottom and side walls with your fingers. Make sure to leave enough dough to make the lids.
  4. With the remaining pastry and cut offs, roll out the dough again and cut out 4 lids.
  5. Place the bottoms of the pie crust pressed into the pie pots into the oven and cook for 15 - 20 minutes. Place the lids into the fridge for later.
Preparing the Filling
  1. Bring to boil the chicken breast in two cups of chicken stock.
  2. When chicken is cooked, remove the chicken and dice it up into small bite sized pieces for the pie.
  3. In a separate fry pan, saute the onion and garlic.
  4. Chop pumpkin and carrots to small bite sized pieces. Cut the heads from the broccolini and add them to the chicken stock in the pot along with the carrot and pumpkin pieces..
  5. Also add the onion and garlic along with the chicken to the chicken stock.
  6. Add all remaining chicken filling ingredients and bring to the boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer on a low heat for 45 minutes.
Putting it all together
  1. When all ingredients are cooked and ready, remove from the stoce and prepare the pie bottoms for filling.
  2. Evenly scoop the chicken pie filling into each pie pot crust filling.
  3. take the pie crust filling lids from the fridge and place them over the top of each pot. Pinch the sides of the pastry to connect the base of the pie with the pie tops. alternatively you can use a fork to do this.
  4. Spear the tops of the pie with a fork and place the pots on a tray in the oven. Cook for 20 minutes ( or until lightly golden brown) at 150 Degrees Celcius.
  5. Remove and let cool for ten minutes before serving.

Choc Top Minty Moments – Cheesecake Medallions

This recipe is an absolute delight if you love chocolate and mint with a splash of coconut cream flavour on a delicious crumbly biscuit bottom.  If you don’t like mint, simply leave that out of the recipe.  Although this recipe is not difficult, it does take some time to prepare but the time taken is […]

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Choc Top Minty Moments Cheesecake Medallions
This recipe is appropriate for people who are following the Full GAPS Diet.
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Rating: 5
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Prep Time 1 Hour
Passive Time 40 Minutes
Servings
Cups
Prep Time 1 Hour
Passive Time 40 Minutes
Servings
Cups
Ingredients
Biscuit Bottom